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Ping-Eee OS in Acer Aspire One Netbook Review

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Most of you must have heard about PinguyOS already, one of my favourite among Ubuntu derivatives. Now, they have released another version of PinguyOS called Ping-Eee OS which is supposedly optimized for small screen netbooks. Interestingly, the release coincided with my purchase of Linux pre installed Acer Aspire One D260 netbook. I was not really impressed by the default Linpus Lite OS that came with it and decided to give Ping-Eee OS a spin in my newly acquired Intel Atom powered Acer Aspire One netbook.

What is Ping-Eee OS?

Ping-Eee OS is built and compiled using the ASUS Eee Netbook and is designed from the ground up to run on netbooks. Even though it uses Ubuntu 11.04 as platform, it use classic GNOME instead of Unity as its default desktop and Compiz version 0.8.6 instead of 0.9.4, pros and cons of which we will discuss later.

Ping-Eee OS - First Impressions

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