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Twitter using Drupal

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Drupal

Starting today, Twitter's developer community lives and breathes on Drupal! Check it out at http://dev.twitter.com.

This is a big deal for Drupal -- it's not every day that one of the hottest technology start-ups switches one of its sites to Drupal. At Acquia, we have been working with Twitter on this site but couldn't talk about it for the longest time. I'm glad we finally can because it's a great use case for Drupal.

Twitter has 750,000 developers who have created nearly a million apps, making 13 billion API calls per day. Those are some astonishing figures! A population that big requires a lot, as we in the Drupal community know.

Fortunately, Drupal handles big communities well.




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