Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Uncle Sam Leads Top 12 Spam Producing Nations

Filed under
Security

Sophos, a global provider in network security, has published the results of its research on the top twelve spam producing countries.

Researchers from SophosLabs, Sophos's global network of virus and spam analysis centers, examined all spam messages received at its global network of spam traps from January 2005 through March 2005.

Based on the analysis, experts found that the United States topped the Dirty Dozen chart once again, exporting an average of 35.70% of all spam during this timeframe. South Korea stood second at 24.98%, while China secured a third place at 9.71%. The other spam exporting countries are France, Spain, Canada, Japan among others.

"Even though the United States is still responsible for producing more than one-third of the world's total volume of spam, the percentage has decreased," said Gregg Mastoras, senior security analyst at Sophos.

"Last month, Sophos estimated that more than 50% of the world's spam came from zombie computers, which are PCs that have been compromised by hackers or virus writers," continued Mastoras.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Lubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 Is Not Using Systemd, Nor LXQt - Screenshot Tour

Lubuntu 15.04 is the last in our screenshot tour articles related to the Final Beta a.k.a. Beta 2 of the Vivid Vervet development cycle. Lubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 offers one of the most lightweight desktop experiences and it is now powered by Ubuntu 15.04’s Linux 3.19.2 kernel. Read more Also: Xubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 Released, Offers a Neat Xfce 4.12 Experience - Screenshot Tour

What is keeping you from switching to Linux?

I'd like to make time for switching my main system but it is not there yet. What I plan to do is however use Linux on my laptop and get used to it this way. While it will take longer than a radical switch, it is the best I can do right now. Eventually though, I'd like to run all but one system on Linux and not Windows. Read more Also: Who’s Using, And Not Using, GNU/Linux Desktops

5 Surprising Reasons Behind The GNOME Resurgence

When the team behind GNOME came out with GNOME 3, which included the infamous GNOME Shell, the most popular desktop environment of the time saw a sharp decrease in users. And honestly, that trend is pretty easy to explain. When GNOME 3 initially came out, it was incomplete, buggy, and foreign. The concepts behind GNOME Shell were never before seen on a desktop system, and lots of users who were used to panels/taskbars and menus didn’t like the rather dramatic changes. Read more