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Musix in the air

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Linux

Linux world is huge. Seems like there are more different distributions then stars in Debian galaxy. Some of them are generic, some of them are not. I have already made couple of reviews of Linux-based Operating System specifically created for creative people. They are brothers in blood: Dynebolic and Puredyne. It would be incomplete set if I just stopped at number 2. Number 3 is much more appalling. That's why today's review will be also dedicated to creative Linux.

This Tux likes music very much, that's why parents named it Musix. Of course, music is not his only hobby, but... more on that later.
This Tux likes freedom most of all, that's why it has nothing which does not conform with Free Software Foundation rules. It is one of a few which are endorsed by this organisation. I have already reviewed some other 100% free OSes from same list: gNewSense and previously mentioned Dynebolic. Musix is so much free that even standard Linux kernel is not good enough for him. Musix features Libre version of kernel instead.

Latest version of Musix was released in November 2009 and has index 2.0. It's image weights about 1.3 Gb, which means it cannot be burnt to CD-RW or to 1 Gb USB stick. That's why I decided to give another option a go. It was my third attempt to run Live OS this way, and previous two failed. Third time lucky, and Musix was "burnt" to HDD using Unetbootin.

Reboot. Choose Unetbootin from boot menu. Let's go!




More in Tux Machines

Goodbye Solaris

  • Guilty SPARC: Oracle euthanizes Solaris 12, expunging it from roadmap
    Rumors have been circulating since late last year that Oracle was planning to kill development of the Solaris operating system, with major layoffs coming to the operating system's development team. Others speculated that future versions of the Unix platform Oracle acquired with Sun Microsystems would be designed for the cloud and built for the Intel platform only and that the SPARC processor line would meet its demise. The good news, based on a recently released Oracle roadmap for the SPARC platform, is that both Solaris and SPARC appear to have a future. The bad news is that the next major version of Solaris—Solaris 12— has apparently been canceled, as it has disappeared from the roadmap. Instead, it's been replaced with "Solaris 11.next"—and that version is apparently the only update planned for the operating system through 2021.
  • Oracle Finally Confirms It's Canning Solaris 12
    At the beginning of December there were rumors of Oracle canning Solaris and now that's finally been confirmed by Oracle more or less as they will not be delivering Solaris 12. According to Ars, they got confirmation from Oracle that they will not be going ahead with Solaris 12 as planned. Solaris 12 has been canceled and wiped off their roadmap. Oracle is said to be working on a "Solaris.next", but no details yet. This "Solaris.next" is also reportedly the only planned Solaris update through 2021.

Microsoft 'Loves' Linux Again

Fedora vs. Ubuntu vs. openSUSE vs. Clear Linux For Intel Steam Gaming Performance

With this week Clear Linux now being able to run Steam, I was excited to see how this performance-minded Linux distribution out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center would compare to other more popular Linux distributions when it comes to Intel Linux gaming performance. Here are some benchmarks of this traditionally workstation/server-oriented Intel Linux distribution running some Steam Linux games. For those that haven't read our past articles with Clear Linux benchmarks, it tends to perform very well for a variety of reasons. Delivering the best Linux performance possible on Intel hardware is one of their driving forces and include features like aggressive CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS by default, using CPUFreq over P-State for CPU frequency scaling, building software packages with function multi-versioning to support both older and newer processors, selectively choosing Clang vs. GCC compilers for each package based upon the performance, carrying some out-of-tree patches, and various other optimizations/tweaks as outlined at ClearLinux.org. Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Some thoughts on switching from Ubuntu to Antergos for Linux gaming
    There’s many reasons for my switch, but the main one has been stability. Ubuntu has been getting more problem-filled with every new release for me so I had enough. Not only that, but due to it being dependent on GNOME packages, stuff was being stripped away too and it’s just a mess now. Some applications have normal title-bars, some have GNOME’s new styling with everything sodding hidden and it’s just all mashed together.
  • Canonical Announces Snapcraft 2.25 with Rust Plugin Improvements, Many Bug Fixes
    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov is announcing the release of Snapcraft 2.25, the open-source tool designed to allow application developers, and anyone else for that matter, to package software projects to the Snap universal binary format. Snapcraft 2.25 has been in development since December 16, 2016, when Canonical announced the release of Snapcraft 2.24, which most of you probably already use on their Ubuntu systems.
  • Dell Precision 5520 Is World’s Thinnest and Lightest 15” Notebook with Ubuntu
    Well, that didn't take too long, and Dell's Barton George announced today, January 18, 2017, the availability for pre-order of the second mobile workstation from the recently unveiled Precision line powered by Ubuntu Linux. The Dell Precision 5520 mobile workstation is now available for pre-order, and you can choose to get it pre-loaded with the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) operating system. Dell Precision 5520 is the second mobile workstation from Dell to be powered by Canonical's Ubuntu OS after Dell Precision 3520.