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The Century of the Linux Desktop

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Linux

Here we go again. Some fellow has gotten all whiny about being such a big Linux fan, "… hardcore Linux user …", but he just had to go back to Microsoft to get things done. Why? Because he is tired of having to tinker with Fedora Linux to make things work, or fail to work, with cutting edge hardware …

As a fan of Linux I am not going to switch to something else voluntarily. I can and will admit that Linux distributions and FOSS packages all have flaws and need work. The KDE4 debacle I think proves my point. When KDE4 applications I used finally ticked me off enough with fighting their problems, I switched … to different FOSS software running on my Mandriva Linux desktop, not to Microsoft.

I care about software freedom as much as I care about software usability. I am not willing to tie my hands with restrictive licensing without a Very Good Reason. A compelling reason. An "I have no other choice" reason.

rest here




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