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Sapphire Radeon HD 6770

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Hardware

Continuing to ensure that Linux benchmarks on the latest AMD Radeon HD graphics processors are available, the kind people at Sapphire have sent over another Radeon HD 6000 series graphics card. After previously reviewing the Sapphire Radeon HD 6570 and Sapphire Radeon HD 6870, up now is the Sapphire Radeon HD 6770. The Radeon HD 6770 (and HD 6750) up until recently was just offered to OEM builders, but now Sapphire has begun selling various products with these graphics processors, which end up being re-branded Radeon HD 5770/5750 "Juniper" graphics processors.

Features:

- 40nm, 850MHz Core
- 1 x Dual-link DVI
- 1 x HDMI 1.4a
- 1 x DisplayPort
- 800 Stream Processors
- 1024MB GDDR5 Memory, 4800MHz Effective Clock

The Radeon HD 6770 is not anything more than a re-branded Radeon HD 5770 with the exact same specs. In the case of the Sapphire Radeon HD 6770 1GB GDDR5 model, they at least did a factory overclock by bumping the core clock to 850MHz rather than operating at the 800MHz reference specification.

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