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Open Source Java: Interview with an Apache Harmony Project Founder

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Software

Harmony, an open source Java implementation, is currently in incubator status at the Apache Software Foundation. The Harmony project mission is to create a compatible, independent implementation of J2SE 5 under the Apache License v2, and "create a community-developed modular runtime (VM and class library) architecture to allow independent implementations to share runtime components, and allow independent innovation in runtime components."

There is a lot of open source activity currently surrounding Java, from JBoss and Geronimo (open source application servers) to MyFaces and Spring (open source web application frameworks), but Java itself is the last proprietary piece of the puzzle. If Harmony is successful, will Sun still matter?

I asked Dalibor Topic, one of the project founders, to tell us more about the history of the project, its importance to the Java community, and plans for the future.

LinuxPlanet: How did the Harmony project get started?

Full Interview.

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