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LXF Interviews now online!

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A new section for the site: the Linux Format Interviews. This is a full archive of recent interviews from the magazine (issues 62 to 73), featuring one-to-one discussions with major players in the Linux world including Alan Cox, Mark Shuttleworth and Michael Robertson. What goes on in the mind of a kernel hacker? Can Debian and Ubuntu co-exist? And what's the deal with all those 'K' names in KDE? Head over to www.linuxformat.co.uk/interviews/ for all the answers...

Samples include:

Eben Moglen (LXF 73, December 2005)
What does the GPL v3 mean for developers and end-users? The Free Software Foundation's top legal counsel explains all

Richard Hipp (LXF 73, December 2005)
You need to be a very good programmer to contribute to SQLite. Richard reveals why his code standards are so high

Michael Meeks (LXF 72, November 2005)
Once writing assembler games on Windows, now a staunch Gnome fan working on OpenOffice.org. We ask: why is OOo so slow?

Mark Shuttleworth (LXF 71, October 2005)
Millionaire, space tourist and now Ubuntu founder. Mark explains why he's backing the distro, and its relationship with Debian

Gael Duval (LXF 70, September 2005)
Mandriva has gone from near collapse to success, and we ask its co-founder: how will the Conectiva and Lycoris mergers pan out?

Alan Cox (LXF 69, August 2005)
Second only to Linus Torvalds in kernel hacking prowess, Alan certainly knows how to keep things calm in a flame war...

Michael Robertson (LXF 68, July 2005)
Former MP3.com owner turned open source advocate and Linspire founder defies claims that running as root is dangerous

These and much more HERE.

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