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OpenSUSE Workstations Used for Rendering Real Facial Expressions in L.A. Noire

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Here is yet another instance where Linux systems are being used for production in entertainment industry. This time Rockstar games, who gave the world Grand Theft Auto series used Linux systems (OpenSUSE/SUSE Linux) in rendering real life facial expressions to the characters in their game L.A. Noire (released on May 17th). Again, KDE is used as the desktop environment. Though I am not able to identify which software (not seems to be native) is being run on the system.

In a video by IGNentertianment, The game developers are talking about how they went on giving real facial expressions to their characters using motion sensor and innovative facial-capture technology. OpenSUSE systems are spotted at 0:55, 1:42 and at 2:30.

Watch here




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