Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Richard Stallman’s Opinion On Dual Booting – “Defenestrate It”

Filed under
Linux

We all know that Richard Stallman has some very strong, serious and unconventional views on software freedom. Well, someone decided to ask him his view on dual booting Linux with Windows. His reply? "Defenestrate it."

Defen what? Well, I must also admit that I have never heard this word before. Stallman was, however, kind enough to include the meaning of the word in his reply.

Well, here is the question pecet wrote to him:




He's simply being a pane...

...get it?!

Re: Defenestrate It

I might not agree with all of Stallman's stances, but I do admire that he sticks to what he believes in. But, to just throw the idea of throwing a dual-boot out the window means just one thing: he's not a gamer. If you -are- (I can game upwards of 40 hours some weeks), you'd only be punishing yourself to get rid of the dual-boot and give up on PC gaming. To me, free software isn't a cause important enough for me to give up my preferred pastime. Do I wish all the games I play in Windows was on Linux? Of course, but that's not how it is, and until that changes, I'll have a dual-boot.

Past that, I don't like GIMP nearly as much as Photoshop (nor does it do as good a job with resizing) and I need Office 2007+ for work-related reasons. For some, it's just not feasible to give up entirely on Windows. It sucks.

re: dualboot

I've given up on dualboot years ago.

Once CPU's became powerful enough and RAM cheap enough to run virtual machines, all of our desktops and laptops run Windows 7 Pro with Virtual Box to run a Linux desktop for the few tasks that Linux Desktop is good at.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. Read more

What is the Fedora Modularity project and how do you get involved ?

The Fedora Modularity Project is an effort to fix several problems that all distributions face. One of them is the disconnect between Fedora's release cycle and the release cycle of larger Fedora components like for example GNOME, KDE or even the kernel. Those components obviously don't have the same lifecycle that Fedora follows and Fedora can't always wait for major components to be released upstream and on the other hand doesn't want to ship outdated software. An earlier attempt to work around this disconnect were the Fedora Rings with a central core 'base design', a concentric ring #2 around it for 'environments and stacks' and a ring #3 for applications. It wasn't possible to have different release cycles for packages in ring #2 as dependencies wouldn't allow that most of the time. Read more

antiX 16 & OpenMandriva 3.0 Beta 2 Release, openSUSE Numbers

It was a busy day in Linux with Slack, antiX, and OpenMandriva all working towards their next releases. Sam Varghese quoted Alberto Planas who said openSUSE sees about 1600 new installations each month and Gentoo's Donnie Berkholz posted his retirement notice. Bruce Byfield posted two interesting articles today, one explaining the difference between an Open Source user and a Free Software Activist and the other describing the stringent Debian packaging policies. As a bonus, a lady in California won a $10,000 award in small claims court from Microsoft over its Windows 10 behavior. Read more Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta2 is here! New Releases!

Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. In this article, I'll walk you through some of the differences between these two freedoms and how they affect Linux usage. Read more