Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Protecting the foundations of Linux – an interview with Jim Zemlin

Filed under

Jim Zemlin is the executive director of the Linux Foundation. In this capacity, he heads up the efforts of the Foundation by bringing important people and organisations together to fix problems. We spoke to Jim two years ago about printing, desktop disparity and the future of Linux on consumer devices. This past April, we caught up with him again while playing his role as Linux User’s guest editor in this our centenary issue, and checked in on those topics.

Perhaps the single biggest change since our first interview with Jim has been the widespread popularity of Linux on handheld devices, mostly thanks to the Android platform. But that’s not all that has changed. Linux has continued to grow in popularity around the world, and recently Zemlin jokingly referred to criticising Microsoft as similar to “kicking a puppy”. Linux, he said, is the default choice for almost every new device-based project,
and on the servers of startups, governments and other cash-strapped organisations.

Jim recently broke his leg while skiing, so he was easy to catch at the annual Linux Collaboration Summit in San Francisco. We chatted with him about the 20th anniversary of Linux, the future of embedded Linux devices, and the current state of the kernel…

rest here

More in Tux Machines

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

Linux Kernel News

Games for GNU/Linux

Today in Techrights