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Linux 2.6.39: XFS Speeds-Up, EXT4 & Btrfs Unchanged

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Linux

While we have already delivered a number of benchmarks from the Linux 2.6.39 kernel, surprisingly we have not yet published any new file-system benchmarks from this latest stable Linux kernel release. Fortunately, that has changed today with a fresh round of Btrfs, EXT4, and XFS file-system benchmarks on the Linux 2.6.39 kernel and compared to the preceding 2.6.38 and 2.6.37 kernel releases.

By now, you are likely used to our file-system benchmarks. Each file-system was tested with its default mount options under each kernel release (Linux 2.6.37, 2.6.38, and 2.6.39). Via the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org were the Apache, PostMark, SQLite, Dbench, Flexible I/O Tester, FS-Mark, Threaded I/O Tester, and IOzone benchmarks.

The system used to facilitate this testing was a Lenovo ThinkPad T61 with an Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 processor, 4GB of system memory, 100GB Hitachi HTS72201 SATA HDD, and NVIDIA Quadro NVS 140M graphics. The file-system benchmarking was done on an Ubuntu 11.04 x86_64 installation with the 2.6.37/2.6.37/2.6.39 vanilla kernels.

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