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Good times with Fedora Linux upgrades

Filed under
Linux

I've used Fedora for years, basically because I've used Red Hat Linux since the late 1990's, and I've always loved the fact that Red Hat stands behind its products. And Fedora is no exception. But, upgrading entire system every 6 months seems extreme when used on an everyday PC. Or is it?

I've found that upgrading from version to version of Fedora is quite easy in fact. And one bonus is that all of the software on the system is automatically upgraded to the latest version which includes the latest bugfixes, etc. Sure, running software updates on the existing distribution running on the system will work, too, but updates are no longer released for a particular version of Fedora about 13 months after it is initially released. While this sounds bad, it really isn't. The upgrade process for Fedora is as simple as inserting the CD (or flash drive), selecting "upgrade" at the main menu, and following a few simple steps. What you end up with is a system that is totally up to date and refreshed with all of the latest RPM packages, while all data is completely retained.

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