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Ubuntu 11.04: an OS for your mum

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Ubuntu

The world is a big place, and it seems of no coincidence that Canonical’s offices sit 27 floors up in the Millbank Tower with a 360 degree view of it right in the middle of London. Canonical is the parent company of the most popular distribution of the free, open-source computer operating system known as Linux and if there’s one thing between them and their broad horizons, it’s Windows.

Since 2004 Ubuntu has offered users another way when it comes to their PCs but with that way one of unfamiliar applications, no hotline support and less compatability then one might get with Mircosoft, it’s been a way largely ignored by the mainstream computer owner. According to Canonical, however, with the launch of the latest version, Ubuntu 11.04, all of that is about to change.

“There’s no real choice for an alternative OS at the moment,” director of communications at Canonical Gerry Carr tells us as he walks Pocket-lint through the redesigned software codenamed Natty Narwhal.

“For the first time, Ubuntu is ready for consumers who are used to a PC experience. We just need people to give it a fair crack and then we’re hoping to see it pre-installed.”

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