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Dropbox 'deceived' users over security: Files are open to government searches

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Security

Dropbox, one of the favourite cloud synchronisation services available for free, ‘deceived’ its users about the security and encryption of its cloud storage services.

A complaint made to the Federal Trade Commission suggests Dropbox employed “deceptive trade practices” by putting it “at a competitive advantage”, with users being told that that Dropbox employees could not access your files or data when they could. It also meant that as files were able to be decrypted by employees.

David Gewirtz’s assertions were correct. You shouldn’t use Dropbox if you have something to hide.

Data held in Dropbox was and still us vulnerable to inspection by U.S. authorities.

rest here

Also: The Cloud is so leaky we should call it The Rain




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