Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat's thin client revival

Filed under
Linux

Today thin-client computing is no longer sexy. Many companies use it successfully but there aren't that many vendors that will trumpet thin-client systems as a way to sexy-up their sales material.

Until now that is.

For those not in the know thin-client technology is simply stripped down workstations that pull all their applications and data from a central server, instead of storing them locally. The obvious benefits are lower workstation costs (not much more than a case, a processor and a power supply) and the ability to centrally manage users and applications. Want a new user on the system? Add them on the server and it's done. A broken user profile? Fix it on the server instead of walking desk to desk to repair simple failures.

Over the years it hasn't been only Ellison that proclaimed thin-clients as the future. Sun Microsystems' Scott McNealy was also a big fan. But despite relative heavyweights backing thin-clients the technology never took off as broadly as most expected as thin-client workstations could never fully replace a desktop PC.

Red Hat




More in Tux Machines

That OpenSUSE Tablet So Far Is A Dud

Remember that "openSUSE Tablet" last year that was seeking crowd-funding and even advertised by the openSUSE crew for being a Linux tablet as cheap as $200 USD? Sadly, it's not a reality while the company still appears to be formulating something. Read more

No-frills networking appliance runs Linux on Apollo Lake

Win Enterprises unveiled a “PL-81210” networking appliance that runs Linux on a dual-core Atom x5-E3930, and offers mini-PCIe, mSATA, and up to 4x GbE. Win Enterprises has launched a low-end networking appliance with three or four Gigabit Ethernet ports, a WAN port, and mini-PCIe expansion. The fanless, PL-81210 runs Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6.4 on a dual-core Intel Atom x5-E3930 from the most recent Apollo Lake generation. Read more

Manjaro 17.0.1 Gellivara (Che Guevara) - Pretty decent

It is time to arch our backs and explore the distroverse some more. That's a horrible pun, I admit, so I'll chase to the cut. Manjaro. It's a nerdy operating system, powered by sacrificial goats, curdled blood, enthusiasm, and heaploads of nerdiness. But then, over the years, it has slowly grown on me, becoming almost usable on a daily basis. A new version is out, carrying the numerical identifier 17.0.1, and there are several desktop flavors available. In order to test the progress and change in Manjaro, I decided to continue with the Xfce version, and so we can compare to previous editions. Now, the system has a rolling update nature, so I could have just upgraded the installed instance on my Lenovo G50 box, but I decided to go for a full, fresh experience. We commence. Read more

gThumb: View and manage your photos in Fedora

Fedora uses Eye of GNOME to display images, but it’s a very basic program. Out of the box, Fedora doesn’t have a great tool for managing photos. If you’re familiar with the Fedora Workstation’s desktop environment, GNOME, then you may be familiar with GNOME Photos. This is a young app available in GNOME Software that seeks to make managing photos a painless task. You may not know that there’s a more robust tool out there that packs more features and looks just as at home on Fedora. It’s called gThumb. Read more