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Red Hat's thin client revival

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Today thin-client computing is no longer sexy. Many companies use it successfully but there aren't that many vendors that will trumpet thin-client systems as a way to sexy-up their sales material.

Until now that is.

For those not in the know thin-client technology is simply stripped down workstations that pull all their applications and data from a central server, instead of storing them locally. The obvious benefits are lower workstation costs (not much more than a case, a processor and a power supply) and the ability to centrally manage users and applications. Want a new user on the system? Add them on the server and it's done. A broken user profile? Fix it on the server instead of walking desk to desk to repair simple failures.

Over the years it hasn't been only Ellison that proclaimed thin-clients as the future. Sun Microsystems' Scott McNealy was also a big fan. But despite relative heavyweights backing thin-clients the technology never took off as broadly as most expected as thin-client workstations could never fully replace a desktop PC.

Red Hat

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