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GNOME 3: Seven Pros and Cons

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Switching to GNOME 3 is both an opportunity and a distraction. On the one hand, it is the opportunity to put aside some annoying behaviors in earlier GNOME releases. On the other hand, GNOME 3 is a distraction because its changes can get in the way of long-established work methods.

As a result, you need to weigh GNOME 3's pros and cons carefully before deciding to make the new desktop part of your everyday computing -- unless, of course, you are the sort who automatically rejects or embraces change simply because it is new.

GNOME 3 contains many changes that average users are unlikely to notice unless they are pointed out. For example, not many are likely to notice that improved hardware interaction means that GNOME 3 offers a Suspend option only on a machine that supports that option. Nor are many going to care much that typing completion in the Activities screen's Search field allows you to launch an application by pressing the Enter key. Such enhancements are easy to overlook, and -- despite their convenience -- too minor to create a large part of anybody's reaction to GNOME 3.

So what factors are likely to influence your decision whether to use GNOME 3? Here are seven pros and several cons of the new desktop that might be important to you:


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