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A (Finally) Winning Linux Hand

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Linux

As IT continues to evolve, we’re starting to see the dominance of two emerging trends in the form of mobile and cloud computing. While both of these trends are closely related, they share at least one attribute in common that is not so obvious: Increasingly both trends are starting to be shaped to one degree or another by Linux.

In the case of mobile computing, the Google Android operating system is having a major impact, especially when it comes to smartphones. On the other end of the spectrum, the vast majority of cloud computing services that have been made available thus far are based on Linux. This has led some to speculate that not only has Linux won, but we may soon see a significant shortage in the availability of trained Linux administrators.

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