Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux is Spoiling Me!!

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

After reading an article about how tests have shown that antivirus solutions, in spite of their struggle to keep Windows systems protected, have fallen behind malware threats (MS Security Essentials among these)--and one company has actually fallen prey of hackers itself--, I realized that Linux is spoiling me.

Really, just about 18 months ago, such news would have caused a state of crisis followed by a detailed investigation of all possible AV solutions, even if mine was among the best rated.

Today, I just grin at the news because I don't even have an antivirus installed.

rest here




re: Spoiling me

Everytime I read one of these Windows is a malware magnet articles, I wonder WTF?

Are those people exceptionally unlucky? Are they running a pirated version of Windows OS so that it can't be updated? Are they too stupid to download one of several FREE anti-virus apps (4 of the free ones rank EXCELLENT in the test they quote). Is it just FUD from Linux Fanboys? Or what?

it's a combination

of ignorant (meaning they just don't know) and idiocy (they don't care to know or do anything about it it when they do).

I can set up a Windows machine from the start with anti-virus apps and other security tools as well as best practices and hardly ever have a problem with malware.

At the same time, I am awash and surrounded by countless, seemingly hundreds of people who fall into one of the two previously mentioned categories with endless and continuous tales of woe. Most of them pertaining to not using the tools and best practices.

Based on my own experience of repairing and maintaining windows systems over the past 15 years, I have no doubt in my mind that MS ships crippled systems to facilitate the the survival of their more lucrative business of licensing access to the source code and software to the many cottage industry players that provide 3rd party devices, software and services built around Windows.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Transcend Wifi SD Card Is A Tiny Linux Server

He read a post about these cards on the OpenWRT forums. They’re all a similar configuration of a relatively large amount of memory (compared to the usual embedded computer), a WiFi chip, and an ARM processor running a tiny Linux install. The card acts as a WiFi access point with a little server running on it, and waits for the user to connect to it via a website. It also has a mode where it will connect to up to three access points specified by the user, but it doesn’t actually have a way to tell the user what its IP address is; which is kind of funny. Read more

Atom-based gateway taps new open source IoT cloud platform

Eurotech’s rugged, IP40 protected “ReliaGate 20-26” IoT gateway runs Red Hat Linux on a Bay Trail Atom, and has cellular, GPS, WiFi, and Bluetooth options. Eurotech’s ReliaGate 20-26 is the latest in a line of Internet of Things gateways, such as the ReliaGate 10-11, based on a TI AM3352 Sitara SoC, and the Intel Atom Z510-based ReliaGate 50-21. For the ReliaGate 20-26, Eurotech advances to a more modern “Bay Trail” Atom E3800. Read more

Scientific Linux 6.8 to Be Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8, RC1 Is Out Now

Today, June 30, 2016, Connie Sieh from the Scientific Linux development team has had the pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the first Release Candidate (RC) of the upcoming Scientific Linux 6.8 operating system. Read more

The OpenGL Speed & Performance-Per-Watt From The Radeon RX 480 To Radeon HD 4850/4870

With the Radeon RX 480 Linux review now being out of the way and our various other RX 480 Linux benchmarks, the latest results I have to share with being a benchmarking fanatic are RX 480 results with high-end AMD GPU tests of each generation going back to the Radeon HD 4850/4870 (RV770) days. This article has high-end GPUs from the RX 480 to RX 200, HD 7900, HD 6900, HD 6800, HD 5800, and HD 4800 series compared side-by-side with the latest open-source Radeon Linux graphics driver code. Not only is the raw performance being looked at but the system power consumption was also being polled in real-time for looking at the performance-per-Watt too. For any other benchmarking fanatics curious about the Radeon GPU evolution over the past eight years (RV770 launch in 2008), here are the numbers to enjoy. Read more