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Mandriva 2011 Beta 2 - The Return of XKill

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Mandriva 2011 Beta 2 was made available earlier today and my interest has been piqued since I saw Eugeni Dodonov's screenshot a couple of days ago. It's gone now, but the whole desktop appeared to be this launcher with a gray background. I was almost panicked. Visions of GNOME 3 and Unity danced through my head. So it's been an excruciating three-day wait for the beta to finally hit mirrors.

That launcher dominating Eugeni's screenshot turned out to be a ROSA menu and it is just that - a great big ole launcher. It lists all the applications and tools available just like a menu, but it's a bit inconvenient in my opinion. Although I have no doubt that some, or perhaps many, will like it. It reminds me of "More applications" from a GNOME 2 Kick-off menu.

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