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New DHCP For Linux?

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Linux

A new DHCP (define) client for Linux is set to take advantage of an expected new feature in a future Linux kernel.

The new DHCP client is being proposed by kernel developer Stefan Rompf and will (when completed) automatically recognize when a Linux user has disconnected from a particular DHCP server and look for a new connection.
But the effort is not without its detractors who feel that a new DHCP client is not necessary for Linux.

DHCP (define) is a cornerstone of Internet connectivity assigning dynamic IP addresses to user connections.

According to Rompf, current DHCP clients on Linux do not recognize temporary disconnections. Such disconnections are common for notebook users that travel between different networks or that roam different hotspots and WLANs.

Rompf argues that the disconnection is not necessarily a limitation of the current 2.6 Linux kernel, as the kernel itself will notify userspace of a disconnection/reconnection event.

However, a feature that is expected to debut in the 2.6.17 Linux kernel will make it even easier to deal with disconnection/reconnection events.

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