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How I multitask in Unity

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Ubuntu
HowTos

I have made a video of how multitasking works in Unity to demonstrate some of the more advanced features.

view here

More in Tux Machines

Security: France, Munich, 'Smart' Meters, MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime

  • Highlights of the French cybersecurity strategy

    First, the document describes that in France cyberdefence and cyberoffence are separated. This is directly opposed to the models employed in Anglo-Saxon countries. But it’s shown as an asset. Key argument: it respects freedoms and civil liberties.

    The document then lists the six general objectives of cyberdefence, namely: prevention, anticipation, protection, detection, attribution, reaction (remediation). The strategy itself is complete, it focuses on civil, military, domestic, external, and international levels. Let’s say it’s a rarity in the business in strategic cybersecurity documents.

    [...]

    The strategy then mentions that one of the solutions could be to release source code and documentation after an end of support date.

  • The Munich Security Conference 2018

    Over the past five decades, the Munich Security Conference (MSC) has become the major global forum for the discussion of security policy. Each February, it brings together more than 450 senior decision-makers from around the world, including heads-of-state, ministers, leading personalities of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as high ranking representatives of industry, media, academia, and civil society, to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges.

  • Smart meters could leave British homes vulnerable to cyber attacks, experts have warned
    New smart energy meters that the Government wants to be installed in millions of homes will leave householders vulnerable to cyber attacks, ministers have been warned.
  • MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime: Researchers nail exploits
    "The flaws—dubbed Meltdown and Spectre—are in chips made by Intel and other major suppliers. They can allow hackers to steal data from the memory of running apps, including password managers, browsers and emails." The authors of the paper on arXiv, Caroline Trippel, Daniel Lustig, and Margaret Martonosi, discuss a tool they developed for "automatically synthesizing microarchitecture-specific programs capable of producing any user-specified hardware execution pattern of interest." They said they show "how this tool can be used for generating small microarchitecture-specific programs which represent exploits in their most abstracted form—security litmus tests."

How Linux became my job

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux. Read more

Linux 4.16-rc2

It's been a quiet week, and rc2 is out. I take the fairly quiet rc be a good sign for 4.16, but honestly, rc2 is often fairly calm. That's probably because people are taking a breather after the merge window, but also simply because it might take a while to find any issues. But let's be optimistic, and just assume - at least for now - that it's because all is well. The diffstat is fairly odd, but that often happens with small rc's just because then just a couple of pulls will skew things easily in one or two directions. This time the patch is about one third architecture updates (arm64, x86, powerpc), one third tooling (mostly 'perf') and one third "rest". And yes, the bulk of that rest is drivers (gpu, nvme, sound, misc), but those drivers are still distinctly *not* the bulk of the whole patch. Go out and test, it all looks fine. Read more Also: Linux 4.16-rc2 Kernel Released

OpenStreetMap in IkiWiki and Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble

  • OSM in IkiWiki
    Since about 15 years ago, I have been thinking of creating a geo-referenced wiki of pubs, with loads of structured data to help searching. I don't know if that would be useful for anybody else, but I know I would use it! Sadly, the many times I started coding something towards that goal, I ended blocked by something, and I keep postponing my dream project.
  • Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble
    That said, while I still believe in the goals of OpenStreetMap, I feel the OpenStreetMap project is currently unable to fulfill that mission due to poor technical decisions, poor political decisions, and a general malaise in the project. I'm going to outline in this article what I think OpenStreetMap has gotten wrong. It's entirely possible that OSM will reform and address the impediments to its success- and I hope it does. We need a Free as in Freedom geographic dataset.