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Interview with Robin Miller, Author of Point and Click OpenOffice.org

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Linux

Internet star Robin "Roblimo" Miller recently wrote "Point & Click OpenOffice.org", a work explaining this suite's basics. The book is meant to be easy and instructive, so that any user can be proficient in OOo in just a few minutes. This interview was conducted with Miller to learn a bit more about the book and its author.

Can you please tell us a bit about yourself? How did you get involved in open source software?

I spent the second half of the 1980s driving cabs and writing freelance articles for local Baltimore-area publications. In the early 1990s I moved into the limousine business and, at the same time, started focusing on science and technology reporting because I got to interview smart people and learn a lot (and the money was good). I wrote a weekly column for Time Digital called "This Old PC" for a while that focused on reuse of old computers and general advice for budget-minded computer users. That inevitably led me to Linux and free software in general.

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