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A dark new future Compiz

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Software
Humor

Above is Aero and Quartz and below is an incredibly important announcement on the future of compiz. Currently they both use proprietary desktop technologies called DWM and WindowServer, however after some consultation with the compiz developers, it has been decided that Aero and Quartz for Microsoft (R) Windows [TM] 8 and Apple (R) Mac OS [TM] X Lion [TM] will be moving to will now use compiz as a base instead of DWM and WindowServer. Most notably this was done for performance reasons, but also because a number of the new interfaces provided in compiz 0.9x allow for some great new stuff to happen with both Aero and Quartz.

So what exactly does this mean for compiz?

Well, it now means compiz is no longer a ‘project without a cause’.

rest here




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