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The Last Remnants of Sun.com Will Go Down on June 1

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Even after such expertise and so many achievements, Sun Microsystems made one wrong business move after another. After the dot com bubble burst a decade ago, Sun was badly affected; it had to make desperate survival attempts by shutting down their facilities one after another. Finally, Oracle saved Sun the embarrassment and bought it when it was undergoing prolonged losses. The end of an era was marked, and here is a tribute to the legend.

Those who have been an absolute favorite of the company have regularly visited Sun.com and will wonder what happens to the website. Well, the domain will be decommissioned on June 1st and the SDN will be moved to the SysAdmin and developer community of the OTN (Oracle Technology Network).

The blogs at the blogs.sun.com subdomain will be moved to a new location at Oracle. However, two comments on the announcement page tell us more than that.

Oracle willingly saying, “we don’t care” about this history of work that exists in the sun.com domain is yet another indication of the sad end of a real legacy of our computing history.

rest here




Don't let the sun go down on me

Although I search myself, it's always someone else I see
I'd just allow a fragment of your life to wander free
But losing everything is like the sun going down on me

Big Grin

Meh

Yes, lets all weep about a failed dot com that couldn't keep it's head (or bottom line) above water.

When you buy a new house do you keep the back bedroom ready for the former owners - just in case?

Sun sold out - end of story. If Oracle can't make a buck off of whatever they ended up buying, you can count on it being tossed, buried, or burned.

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