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How many out there use Linux? I bet if I asked 100 people, less than 10 percent would say yes. To be fair, people think in terms of computers, laptops, netbooks, and desktops, and that demographic is 90 percent Windows, 90 percent Microsoft-centric. But computers and OSes that power them permeate all aspects of our lives today.

While people mostly don't care about computing they don't directly choose and pay for, I think people might be surprised at the numbers and how much they do use Linux. Let's let people know computing doesn't always equate to Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) or Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL). Let's spread the word that our world of technology is often "powered by Linux."

Linux Everywhere

Do you Google (Nasdaq: GOOG)? You use Linux! Do you do shop at Amazon (Nasdaq: AMZN)? You use Linux! Do you have a router for your home network? Do you have NAS (Network Attached Storage) on your home network for shared backups? Do you own a Logitech (Nasdaq: LOGI) Squeezebox? Do you Tivo your shows? How about a smartphone (not iPhone)? Linux, Linux, Linux, Linux and probably Linux.

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