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Open office dilemma: vs. LibreOffice

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OOo is one of the leading competitors to the Microsoft Office suite of business productivity applications. Originally developed as StarOffice in the late 1990s, the suite had been managed in recent years by Sun Microsystems as an open source project. But when Oracle acquired Sun in April 2009, the future of Sun's software offerings -- particularly free ones like -- was called into question. Before long, key developers, unhappy with the status quo under Oracle, began defecting from the project.

The result was LibreOffice, a new fork of the code base that's maintained by a nonprofit organization called the Document Foundation. LibreOffice looks like and it runs like It even reads and writes's OpenDocument file formats. The difference is that LibreOffice is being developed in a fully community-driven way, without oversight from Oracle. (The "libre" in the suite's name is derived from a Latinate root meaning "liberty.")

The question is, which suite should you use? Both and LibreOffice recently announced version 3.3.0 of their respective wares. Both are available as free downloads (although Oracle also sells a version of that includes commercial support). Which one will be the better bet for now or in the foreseeable future? I installed both to find out.

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