Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mandriva Linux 2011TP (Tech Preview) - Quick Look

Filed under
Reviews

After laying-off a significant portion of its employees, is Mandriva going to remain a viable distribution? While many distros, including Mandriva, are furiously working on their Spring 2011 releases, Mandriva announced a two-week slip from their previously announced release dates. As a compensation, Mandriva gathered up its packages from its 2011 development repositories (called "Cooker"), and released a pre-alpha 2011 TP (Technology Preview) iso. The coming Alpha version is due to be released February 14 with Alpha2 slated to be released February 28. So, here's a quick report on the Technology Preview release, and how things are shaping up.

Many of Mandriva's recently laid off employees went on to form a fork of Mandriva called "Mageia". According to Susan Linton (Owner, operator and exalted grand pubah of Tuxmachines.org), Mageia Alpha1 is also due to be released mid February. It will be interesting to compare the two Alpha1 releases.

But, back to the Mandriva TP release. I downloaded the x86-64 bit TP ISO version yesterday (Feb 7), burned it, and proceeded to install it on "newton", my Acer Aspire 6930 Laptop (3 GB Ram, Nvidia 9600M GS video card, 7200 RPM hard disk (an upgrade after initial purchase), Intel wireless, and 1366x768 display).

The install went smoothly, except when rebooting--Mandriva TP did not pick-up my Windows 7 Partition in the boot window. The Win7 partition is still there--in fact, I can access the Win 7 files from Linux, so no worries (I rarely need to use Win 7).

Mandriva has updated its RPM system from RPM 4.6 to RPM 5. Because of the differing RPM versions, those wanting to update their older 2010 Mandriva installs to Cooker should be forwarned, there are extra steps to be taken. If you're one of these people, check-out the procedure here.

My first step, after installation was to update the TP release to the current state of Cooker (as of Feb 7). Then I installed the newest and latest KDE 6.0 stuff.

Like many distros lately, the open source Nouveau driver for nvidia video is installed by default. In fact, there is no proprietary Nvidia driver in Mandriva's cooker repositories. So, I went to Nvidia's web site, downloaded their proprietary driver, and compiled it for the TP kernel (Linux 2.6.37). Much to my surprise, this worked well. When the Nouveau driver performance becomes congruent to Nvidia's proprietary driver, I will switch to the Nouveau driver. Actually, the Nouveau driver performed fairly well, and is getting closer in quality to Nvidia's driver. I was surprised at how well the KDE desktop effects worked under the Nouveau driver.

Again, to my surprise, as Mandriva's 2011 Alpha 1 release approaches, I find it to be remarkably stable, fluid, and capable from the KDE side. The only issues I've encountered are from the flaky Firefox beta (4.0 beta10) browser, which is why I'm blogging this to Tuxmachines from the Rekonq browser.

In fact, I'm going to keep this (very) early version of Mandriva 2011 installed on my laptop, and update the packages daily.

UPDATE: An update of D-Bus BORKED this system yesterday. Lost my sound. Other issues. Looks like I'll wait for the 2011 Alpha1 release.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE

  • Kubuntu Wily Alpha 2
    The Second Alpha of Wily (to become 15.10) has now been released!
  • Plasma Mobile References Images by Kubuntu
    We launched Plasma Mobile at KDE’s Akademy conference, a free, open and community made mobile platform.
  • The Sun Sets on KDE-Solaris
    The KDE-Solaris site has been shuttered. The subdomain now redirects to KDE techbase, which documents the last efforts related to KDE on then-OpenSolaris. From the year 2000 or earlier until 2013, you could run KDE — two, three or four — on Solaris, either SPARC or (later) x86. I remember doing packaging for my university, way back when, on a Sun Enterprise 10000 with some ridiculous amount of memory — maybe 24GB, which was ridiculous for that time. This led — together with some guy somewhere who had a DEC Alpha — to the first 64-bitness patches in KDE. Solaris gave way to OpenSolaris, and Stefan Teleman rebooted the packaging efforts in cooperation with Sun, using the Sun Studio compiler. This led to a lot of work in the KDE codebase in fixing up gcc-isms. I’d like to think that that evened up the road a little for other non-gcc compilers later.
  • What It Takes Porting Qt Applications To Wayland

Tizen Leftovers

  • Tizen 2.3.1 and Tizen 2.4 Beta SDK Mobile Preview announced at Tizen Developer Summit 2015 Bengaluru India
    At the Tizen Developer Summit 2015 (TDS) event in Bengaluru, India July 30-31, Samsung has announced new Tizen SDKs for their Smartphones, Smartwatches, and Smart TVs. The Summit is focused in helping to grow the Tizen ecosystem by educating developers to the Tizen Operating System. Samsung are still offering developers 100% revenue for their apps until January 2016, making it an attractive proposition.
  • [Developer] AIDA64 now available for Tizen
    AIDA64 is a Hardware and software information utility for tizen based devices. Based on the extensive hardware knowledge of the AIDA64 for Windows application, AIDA64 for Tizen is capable of showing various diagnostic information for the phones and tablets including:

Android Leftovers