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Best Hard Drives?

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Linux

I think my hard drive is going out. It's been a while since I bought one. I used to really like Maxtor, but I think they were bought out. By who? I bought a Western Digital a couple years ago and it didn't last too long. I had a samsung one time that lasted for like 10 years! So, what are your opinions of the best, as in sturdy, dependable, and long lasting, hard drives today?

I really got my eye on this one. It's a Western Digital, but it has a five year warranty where most others have a 3 or 1 year. There are a lot of good reviews and several bad ones, but they all have good and bad reviews.

What brand do you guys like?

Gonna have to keep it to SATA cause SSD seem quite expensive. Tongue

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re: HD

We use the enterprise class Seagate or Wester Digital drives. Seagate has a no hassle warranty procedure (we just received a warranty replacement for a drive we fumble fingered and broke the data connector off - we fessed up in the trouble ticket and they replaced it under warranty anyways).

Currently the 10K rpm WD Velociraptor are the fastest non-SSD drives on the market (even faster then the Seagate hybrid drive for most applications).

Luckily, SATA is so cheap these days it's not that big of a deal if they don't make it much past 3 years - you do after all have a viable (and tested) daily backup scheme right?

re: HD

Weell, no not usually on my desktop. I have been backing up my important stuff since my drive started acting up.

Those hybrids look interesting. I think I have it narrowed down between this one and this one.

Thanks.

re: Hard Drive

If you're looking for raw speed, then the 10K VR WDC drives are faster then the Seagate Hybrid.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/3734/seagates-momentus-xt-review-finally-a-good-hybrid-hdd

The 10K VR WDC comes in 200G, 400G, 600G versions. We're updating most of our boot drives to the 200G model and see an overall 10-20% speed increase in the systems.

If you want the Seagate Hybrid (interesting concept, but keep in mind it's just READ caching, not READ & WRITE caching) I'd avoid TigerDirect like the plague. Newegg sells that drive for the same price.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148592&Tpk=ST93205620AS

re: Hard Drive

naw speed is secondary really.

I think I'll try out that hybrid for a month or two. Like you said, hard drives have gotten so cheap these days I can a regular one if I don't like it.

Thanks!

Hybrid Hard Drive

srlinuxx wrote:
naw speed is secondary really.

I think I'll try out that hybrid for a month or two. Like you said, hard drives have gotten so cheap these days I can a regular one if I don't like it.

Thanks!

I was just wondering if you ever got the hybrid drive and if so how do you like it?

Tex

re: Hybrid HD

Yeah, I been using since soon after that post. But I can't tell a significant speed increase using it. In fact, testing with hdparm shows it not as fast as my regular SATA drive on sdb - but I had stuff going on on the hybrid. So, I don't know if there is any real advantage or not.

I've since read of disadvantages such as numerous spin ups and downs. Some folks could actually hear their drives growling about it. Well, I don't know if mine was spinning up and down a lot but I still updated the firmware and I'm believing that was a good move despite no real proof. Big Grin

So, in summary, yeah it works but I don't think it's any faster than regular harddrives. I'd advise folks not to buy one if it costs significantly more - but yeah buy one if you find it on sale if you wanna.

Next up -> a real SSD.

Hard drives

I've mostly been using enterprise level Seagate and WD, both at home, and at the company. Price difference between consumer and enterprise is small these days, and hence I agree that it's better to pay the extra money.

If you look at the hybrid Seagate drive, take into account future plans. You'll get double storage capacity if choosing a regular hard drive, and leave the option open for a SSD upgrade to speed up the OS itself. 60-80GB SSD isn't that expensive any more, and I suppose it's more than enough for most of us to run a Linux OS.

re: Hard Drive

I have bad experiences with WD. I have had three, all where warm and noisy and one crashed after less than 15 months. I have replaced the other two with Samsung drives of same size and speed, and they run much cooler and quieter. So much cooler that my big tower cabinet temperature dropped 1.5C. It's to early to say anything about reliability, but lower temperature and less vibrations can't harm.

I can only second that. I had

I can only second that. I had several WD in the past and all were noisy and hot. Right now I have a 750G Samsung Green, bought about 3 years ago. It works very well, I can't even hear it and it is about 10 C (ten degrees) cooler then my 160G Hitachi which is also in the same computer.
So, for a usual desktop system I would recommend Samsung. But if you want extreme performance, you probably will have to go with something else. I consider my Samsung's performance satisfactory and more than enough for my needs, but other may consider they need a faster drive.

WD Green Drives

Stay away from the so-called "green" drives with Western Digital. Not only do they not make any difference in a desktop system (with a 500W PSU), I have lost 6 of 10 of those drives at my place of business. Of the 6 replacements, 2 died within a month and I am beginning to suspect issues with 2 others. (and... no, no RAID... just straight drives, though the systems are pretty much on 24/7)

I have also gotten some of the WD Black drives... I think 3 of them. No problems yet. The Seagate drives have been 0% defective and are all I typically buy now.

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