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Zarafa Shows Open Source Momentum at FOSDEM 2011

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Presenting 10-fold increases in speed of new IMAP gateway and the doubling of Enterprise MySQL performance

At FOSDEM 2011 (5-6 February, Brussels), Zarafa, the leading European provider of open source groupware and collaboration will present its new Zarafa Collaboration Platform (ZCP) 7.0.0 beta2 with a new, faster IMAP gateway and share how Enterprise MySQL performance can be doubled.

Joint Zarafa Community Efforts Results in New IMAP gateway
Community contributions and valuable feedback has enabled Zarafa to launch a new ZCP IMAP gateway that also helps ZCP to benefit from 10-fold increases in speed and new possible security enhancements. Better compatibility for users with generic IMAP clients, like Mac Mail and Thunderbird, has been realized due to a new configuration option to store more message information.

Guy van Sanden, open source consultant at the Belgian system integrator Open future says: “Besides Zarafa’s recent decision to make the bug tracking system public, it thrills me that, from now on, all PGP/mime emails and s/mime encrypted mails will be supported and all message headers can be retrieved. The test results are promising”.

Doubling MySQL Performance Well Received by Open Source Opinion Leaders
On Saturday, 5th of February at 2pm in the MySQL Developer Room (H.2213), Steve Hardy, CTO at Zarafa, will present the results of research3 into the I/O performance of MySQL in typical enterprise setups. This new development can improve total disk throughput by more than 100% in certain cases.

Mark Callaghan of Facebook says: ”This is very interesting. My workload has too much concurrency already so I am most interested in the change to make records_in_range do less IO”.

The interaction with leading technical IO architects and the acceptance of this talk at the FOSDEM MySQL track is in line with Zarafa´s determination to display its commitment to state of the art thought leadership in groupware I/O R&D.

Press contacts
Zarafa
Mirjam Scholtes, Communication & PR Manager
Tel: +31 (0)15 2517710, M: +31 (0)6 55114984
Email: m.scholtes@zarafa.com

About Zarafa
Zarafa is the leading European provider of open source groupware and collaboration software. The company is headquartered in Delft, the Netherlands. Zarafa’s offices in Stuttgart, Hannover and Belo Horizonte (Brazil) provide local sales and support to more than 150 partners and thousands of customers worldwide.

Our core product is the Zarafa Collaboration Platform (ZCP), the European open and compatible groupware platform that can be used as a drop-in Microsoft Exchange replacement for email, calendaring, collaboration and tasks. Zarafa is acclaimed for its unrivalled expertise in calendar and mobile compatibility. Learn more at http://www.zarafa.com. Follow Zarafa on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/zarafagroupware.

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3 Research into the I/O performance of MySQL in typical enterprise setups
Tests have shown that InnoDB is not using traditional spindle-based I/O subsystems to their maximum potential while doing OLTP workloads with I/O-bound queries. Pages are requested sequentially from the disk system instead of asynchronously, even when using MySQL 5.5's native Aynchronous I/O support. The presentation shows the advantages of implementing a prefetch mechanism which can result in large gains in I/O performance. For more information about the InnoDB prefetch improvement see this mailinglist post: http://lists.mysql.com/internals/38126.

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