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Original Articles from 2010

  1. Results are in: openSUSE's Community Survey - 30 Dec 10
  2. Spotlight on Linux: VectorLinux 6.0 - 29 Dec 10
  3. PCLOS 64-Bit Suffers Delays, but Still Coming - 28 Dec 10
  4. Unity Coming to openSUSE too?! - 24 Dec 10
  5. Sabayon Christmas Gaming Edition is Here - 23 Dec 10
  6. First Mageia Packagers Meeting Signals Beginning - 22 Dec 10
  7. Allegations of OpenBSD Backdoors May be True, Updated - 22 Dec 10
  8. Mandriva Wallpaper Contest Winners Chosen - 21 Dec 10
  9. My Top Five Favorite Distributions for 2010 - 19 Dec 10
  10. Red Hat Dictates Fedora 15 Wallpaper - 16 Dec 10
  11. Ubuntu Indicators in openSUSE? - 15 Dec 10
  12. Debian Squeeze Kernel to be Completely Free - 15 Dec 10
  13. Government Backdoors in OpenBSD? - 14 Dec 10
  14. Spotlight on Linux: ZevenOS-Neptune 1.9.1 - 14 Dec 10
  15. Is Zorin OS Really Easier than Ubuntu? - 13 Dec 10
  16. Top 10 Ideas for Upcoming Ubuntu Releases - 10 Dec 10
  17. Sabayon to Bring Christmas Surprise - 09 Dec 10
  18. Enter Mandriva's Wallpaper Contest - 09 Dec 10
  19. Mageia Has an Official Logo - 08 Dec 10
  20. Has the Novell Deal Hampered openSUSE? - 08 Dec 10
  21. Xfce 4.8.0 on Track for January Release - 07 Dec 10
  22. Fedora Moving to Unity Too - 03 Dec 01
  23. Mageia Trudging on to Release - 02 Dec 01
  24. The openSUSE and Ubuntu Rollercoasters - 01 Dec 10
  25. openSUSE to Offer a Rolling Release - 01 Dec 10
  26. The (open)Fate of openSUSE - 30 Nov 10
  27. What's Coming in Mandriva 2011 - 26 Nov 10
  28. Things for which I'm Grateful - 25 Nov 10
  29. Ubuntu to Become a Rolling Release - 23 Nov 10
  30. SimplyMepis Celebrates 8th Anniversary with Release - 23 Nov 10
  31. Updated: Novell Sold - What Will Become openSUSE? - 22 Nov 10
  32. PCLinuxOS to Get a 64-bit Version - 19 Nov 10
  33. Just Another Ubuntu-based Distro or Something More - 18 Nov 10
  34. Debian Trying to Recruit More Women - 17 Nov 10
  35. Spotlight on Linux: Fedora 14 - 17 Nov 10
  36. Fedora Welcomes in New Management - 16 Nov 10
  37. Debian 6.0 Homestretch Just Around Corner - 15 Nov 10
  38. Mandriva Christmas Present and Beyond - 12 Nov 10
  39. Fusion Linux 14 Mere Weeks Away - 11 Nov 10
  40. PCLinuxOS Releases a Slew of Quarterly Updates - 10 Nov 10
  41. SimplyMepis 11.0 on Its Way! - 10 Nov 10
  42. Mandriva Fork Mageia to See Alpha this December - 09 Nov 10
  43. Compiz to be Rewritten for Ubuntu Wayland - 07 Nov 10
  44. Is Shuttleworth Crazy, Brave, or Smart? - 05 Nov 10
  45. Pardus 2011 on the way with new goodies - 05 Nov 10
  46. MyPaint hits 0.9 and is looking good - 03 Nov 10
  47. Pinta 0.5 Released - What's it like? - 02 Nov 10
  48. OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Almost Here - Is It the Last? - 01 Nov 10
  49. What Will Happen to GNOME Now? - 01 Nov 10
  50. Command Line not out of fashion everywhere - 29 Oct 10
  51. Open Source for Amercia Honors Open Source Advocates - 28 Oct 10
  52. Spotlight on Linux: Arch Linux 2010.05 - 28 Oct 10
  53. Mozilla Releases Firefox 3.6.12 and Delays 4.0 - 27 Oct 10
  54. Fedora 14 Has Gone Gold - 26 Oct 10
  55. Oracle OpenOffice.org vs. TDF LibreOffice - 26 Oct 10
  56. Compiz Brings New Eye Candy to You and Ubuntu - 25 Oct 10
  57. First look at Kubuntu 10.10 - 18 Oct 10
  58. Oracle Confirms Committment to OpenOffice.org - 14 Oct 10
  59. Ubuntu 10.10 almost ready for you - 07 Oct 10
  60. Fedora 14 Well On Its Way to a Desktop Near You - 07 Oct 10
  61. Your Office is Saved -- OpenOffice.org Forked! - 04 Oct 10
  62. Spotlight on Linux: SliTaz GNU/Linux 3.0 - 29 Sep 10
  63. Developers fork Mandriva Linux - Welcome Mageia - 24 Sep 10
  64. OpenIndiana Picks up Where OpenSolaris Left off - 22 Sep 10
  65. sidux changes to aptosid by upgrade or ISO - 21 Sep 10
  66. Why Broadcom's Release More Significant than Just Code - 17 Sep 10
  67. More on Canonical's Contributions - 16 Sep 10
  68. Debian Updates, Code Names, Back Ports, Screenshots, and Derived - 15 Sep 10
  69. Scary New Horror Adventure Available for Linux - 13 Sep 10
  70. Two Popular Distributions Release Development Milestones - 10 Sep 10
  71. Spotlight on Linux: Zenwalk Linux 6.4 "Live" - 08 Sep 10
  72. Old Generals Never Die - They just Wear a Red Hat - 07 Sep 10
  73. No Steam for Linux - Right Now - 02 Sep 10
  74. As Predicted, OpenSolaris Board Disbands - 01 Sep 10
  75. Google Adds Phone Calls to Linux Gmail Use - 31 Aug 10
  76. Spotlight on Linux: Parsix 3.6 (RC) - 25 Aug 10
  77. Gmail Voice and Video Chat - Too Little too Late? - 20 Aug 10
  78. Two Distributions Celebrate Birthdays - 19 Aug 10
  79. Where do Debian Developers Come From? - 18 Aug 10
  80. Oracle Delivers Friday the 13th Bad Luck to FOSS - 16 Aug 10
  81. Debian 6.0 on Track for December Release - 12 Aug 10
  82. Spotlight on Linux: openSUSE 11.3 - 11 Aug 10
  83. Spin Your Own Debian with Live Studio - 10 Aug 10
  84. Legal DVD Playback Coming to Linux? - 09 Aug 10
  85. Illumos Makes OpenSolaris Board Threat Moot - 06 Aug 10
  86. Ubuntu Empire Strikes Back - 30 Jul 10
  87. Spotlight on Linux: SimplyMEPIS 8.5.x - 29 Jul 10
  88. Prettier Fonts Coming Your Way - 27 Jul 10
  89. OpenOffice.org 3.3 Definitely On Its Way - 26 Jul 10
  90. India's $35 Tablet- The Everything Killer - 23 Jul 10
  91. Will Oracle Let OpenSolaris Whither and Die? - 22 Jul 10
  92. Spotify Comes to Linux - Well, Some Linux - 20 Jul 10
  93. A week or two with Kongoni GNU/Linux* - 18 Jul 10
  94. Mandriva Press Release Raises More Questions - 15 Jul 10
  95. Spotlight on Linux: Pardus Linux 2009.2 - 14 Jul 10
  96. openSUSE 11.0 Gets Short Stay of Execution - 13 Jul 10
  97. Mandriva and Derivative Release Latest - 12 Jul 10
  98. A New Era of Compiz - 08 Jul 10
  99. Spotlight on Linux: Sabayon Linux 5.3 - 07 Jul 10
  100. Two Popular Distros Release Latest Wares - 06 Jul 10
  101. OpenOffice.org to use GStreamer for Multimedia - 05 Jul 10
  102. Kanotix 2010 - 01 Jul 10
  103. Debian Opens "Front Desk" for Derivatives - 01 Jul 10
  104. Mandriva's Future Rosy or Rose Colored? - 30 Jun 10
  105. EFF delivers HTTPS Not Quite Everywhere - 29 Jun 10
  106. Mozilla, Opera, and Flock Release VP8 Ready Browsers - 22 Jun 10
  107. Spotlight on Linux: Linux Mint 9 - 16 Jun 10
  108. Spotlight on Linux: Slackware Linux 13.1 - 02 Jun 10
  109. Spotlight on Linux: PCLinuxOS 2010 - 12 May 10
  110. From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots* - 05 May 10
  111. Freshly Squeezed Debian: Installing from Live DVD* - 20 Apr 10
  112. SimplyMepis 8.5 - 15 Apr 10
  113. Stop Wine-ing: 15 Games for Linux - 28 Mar 10
  114. Secret Future Ubuntu User Interface Plans Revealed!* - 27 Mar 10
  115. DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 341 - 15 Feb 10
  116. LinuxCertified Laptop – a review* - 05 Feb 10
  117. From (Y)AWN to Cairo!* - 31 Jan 10
  118. Buying a Linux Laptop ...* - 22 Jan 10
  119. Screencasting Under Linux--A brief Story* - 15 Jan 10
  120. School computer introductions* - 13 Jan 10

* - Posts by other contributers.










More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • #RecruitmentFocus: Open source skills in high demand
    The unemployment rate in South Africa rose to 27.5% in the third quarter of 2018, while the demand for skills remains high - leaving an industry conundrum that is yet to be solved. According to SUSE, partnerships that focus on upskilling graduates and providing real-work skills, as well as placement opportunities - could be exactly what the industry in looking for.
  • Stable: not moving vs. not breaking
    There are two terms that brings a heavy controversy in the Open Source world: support and stable. Both of them have their roots in the “old days” of Open Source, where its commercial impact was low and very few companies made business with it. You probably have read a lot about maintenance vs support. This controversy is older. I first heard of it in the context of Linux based distributions. Commercial distribution had to put effort in differentiating among the two because in Open SOurce they were used indistictly but not in business. But this post is about the adjectivet stable…
  • Cameron Kaiser: A thank you to Ginn Chen, whom Larry Ellison screwed
    Periodically I refresh my machines by dusting them off and plugging them in and running them for a while to keep the disks spinnin' and the caps chargin'. Today was the day to refurbish my Sun Ultra-3, the only laptop Sun ever "made" (they actually rebadged the SPARCle and later the crotchburner 1.2GHz Tadpole Viper, which is the one I have). Since its last refresh the IDPROM had died, as they do when they run out of battery, resetting the MAC address to zeroes and erasing the license for the 802.11b which I never used anyway. But, after fixing the clock to prevent GNOME from puking on the abnormal date, it booted and I figured I'd update Firefox since it still had 38.4 on it. Ginn Chen, first at Sun and later at Oracle, regularly issued builds of Firefox which ran very nicely on SPARC Solaris 10. Near as I can determine, Oracle has never offered a build of any Firefox post-Rust even to the paying customers they're bleeding dry, but I figured I should be able to find the last ESR of 52 and install that. (Amusingly this relic can run a Firefox in some respects more current than TenFourFox, which is an evolved and patched Firefox 45.)
  • Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science
    For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming. So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices. But no matter how daunting this task may seem, it’s a necessary and vital one. So in 2012, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International publicly launched the Ocean Health Index (OHI), an ambitious initiative to measure the benefits that oceans provide to people, including clean water, coastal protections, and biodiversity. The idea was to create an annual assessment to document major oceanic changes and trends, and in turn, use those findings to craft better marine policy around the world.

Openwashing Leftovers

The Last Independent Mobile OS

The year was 2010 and the future of mobile computing was looking bright. The iPhone was barely three years old, Google’s Android had yet to swallow the smartphone market whole, and half a dozen alternative mobile operating systems—many of which were devoutly open source—were preparing for launch. Eight years on, you probably haven’t even heard of most of these alternative mobile operating systems, much less use them. Today, Android and iOS dominate the global smartphone market and account for 99.9 percent of mobile operating systems. Even Microsoft and Blackberry, longtime players in the mobile space with massive revenue streams, have all but left the space. Then there’s Jolla, the small Finnish tech company behind Sailfish OS, which it bills as the “last independent alternative mobile operating system.” Jolla has had to walk itself back from the edge of destruction several times over the course of its seven year existence, and each time it has emerged battered, but more determined than ever to carve out a spot in the world for a truly independent, open source mobile operating system. After years of failed product launches, lackluster user growth, and supply chain fiascoes, it’s only been in the last few months that things finally seem to be turning to Jolla’s favor. Over the past two years the company has rode the wave of anti-Google sentiment outside the US and inked deals with large foreign companies that want to turn Sailfish into a household name. Despite the recent success, Jolla is far from being a major player in the mobile market. And yet it also still exists, which is more than can be said of every other would-be alternative mobile OS company. Read more