Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenOffice.org 3.3

Filed under
OOo

Pros

Updated user interface, particularly in Impress
Stronger document-protection options in Writer and Calc
Improved print dialogue in Writer
More attractive charts and usable pivot tables in Calc

Cons

Word 2010 couldn't open a password-protected ODF document in our tests
No SVG import in Draw

Amid infighting between Oracle and defecting OpenOffice developers, can the new version of OpenOffice.org, 3.3.0, deliver its 'fit and trim' release promise? And how does the new version stack up against the leading paid-for productivity suite, Microsoft Office?

OpenOffice 3.3 was supposed to be a fairly swift update to the open-source office suite, adding some useful features, showcasing the first results of the Renaissance project to improve the user interface — and proving that OpenOffice was still safe in Oracle's hands.

Instead, OOo 3.3 has been overshadowed by the departure of a number of core OpenOffice developers to set up The Document Foundation to steward the LibreOffice fork (which is based on the OpenOffice 3.3 code and promises significant future improvements like a new spreadsheet engine as well as what the foundation calls 'radical innovations' rather than the incremental changes that Oracle has focused on).

rest here




Officially Announced

OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 (build OOO330m20) is out now!

In this feature release many new things were implemented. Get an overview what could be interesting for you in our Feature Overview. The Release Notes show this from a technical point of view. Of course there is also an official Press Announcement.

Get it now from the download webpage.

rest here

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Alfresco Raises A Fresh $45M To Fuel Open-Source Enterprise Content Management

Alfresco, an open source, enterprise content management startup, is today announcing a new round of funding of $45 million — a Series D round that is more than twice as big as all of its previous rounds put together. The UK-based company competes against legacy services like Documentum (which was co-founded by one of Alfresco’s co-founders, John Newton) and Sharepoint to help large organisations manage their disparate document storage both in the cloud and on-premises, and also offer versioning control and other compliance requirements across mobile, PC and other devices. Alfresco will use the new funding to step its business up a gear, with new sales and marketing efforts, and moves into more cloud-based services that could see it competing more directly also against the likes of Dropbox, Box and Huddle. Read more

HandyLinux 1.6.1 Is a Linux Distro with a Windows Vibe

HandyLinux is a newer operating system and its developers have tried to provide a clear and familiar desktop interface. It might feel like it has a Windows 8 vibe, which is probably an effect of the theme used, but the OS is actually quite interesting. One of the most interesting aspects of the distribution is the menu launcher, which is quite odd. It opens a new window with all the applications and the user has to choose from there on. It's definitely something different from the norm. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of use in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more

Intel's Latest Linux Graphics Code Competes Against OS X 10.9

Tests I carried out last month with a Haswell-based Apple MacBook Air showed Linux largely smashing OS X 10.9 with the latest open-source graphics driver code on Linux over Apple's OpenGL driver. Today I'm testing the latest OS X 10.9.4 state against the newest Linux kernel and Intel Mesa driver code on Ubuntu while this time using an older Sandy Bridge era Apple Mac Mini. Read more