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Switching to Desktop Linux? 6 Ways to Ease the Migration

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Linux

With all the many compelling reasons for a company to switch to Linux on the desktop, it's no wonder that businesses large and small are increasingly relying on the free and open source operating system. After all, it's free, flexible, reliable, and highly secure--to name just a few of the most attractive features.

No matter how good your reasons for switching from Windows to Linux, however, the fact remains that most of us don't like change. That--more than anything else--is why migrations of any kind can be painful.

One of the most common mistakes new desktop Linux users make is to give up too easily, often citing the frequently heard myth that "It's too hard." The truth, however, is that it's just different. It may be difficult to remember at this point, but Windows took some getting used to, too.

How can you make the desktop Linux migration process as easy as possible in your business? Here are a few suggestions.

1. Get Buy-In at the Top




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