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5 Best Video Game Console Emulators for Linux

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Gaming

In Computer Science, emulation refers to the capability of a computer software or hardware to replicate the functions of another software or hardware. Hence, video game console emulators are programs that enable computers to imitate the behavior of different video game consoles such as Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES), Game Boy (GB), Sega Dreamcast, and Sony PlayStation. To help you understand video game console emulators even more, you may check out this post: Play Classic Super Nintendo (SNES) Games on Ubuntu Linux.

I have here a list of some of the best video game console emulators for Linux that you can download and use for free:

PCSX2

PCSX2 is a PlayStation 2 (PS2) emulator that is based on a plug-in architecture. Varying plug-ins may produce different results in both compatibility and capability. The major choke point in PS2 emulation is emulating the multi-core PS2 on PC x86 architecture because accurately synchronizing the cores is very complex. This why using multi-core CPUs such as Core 2 Duo and Core-i series are highly recommended when playing PS2 games via PCSX2. As of the moment, a number of plugins are still being developed to improve compatibility and overall performance.

rest here




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