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London's Design Museum Recognizes Ubuntu Fonts

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LONDON, Jan. 24, 2011 -- The Ubuntu Project today announced the opening of a new exhibition at London’s Design Museum dedicated to the Ubuntu Font, in collaboration with international typeface designers Dalton Maag.

Entitled "Shape My Language," the exhibition will run from January 28 to February 28, 2011. The exhibition marks a significant milestone for the Ubuntu Project’s advance in design and aims to enhance the consumer experience of using open computing platforms, such as Ubuntu.

Leading international typeface designer Dalton Maagheaded up development of the Ubuntu Font Family, which was designed with both aesthetics and productivity in mind. The stylish design helps users and developers portray and emphasize their messages through the typeface, which was carefullycrafted to allow readers to easily absorb written content.

The development of the Ubuntu Font Family is funded by Canonical Ltd. on behalf of the wider free software community. As expected of the Ubuntu project, the fonts are free to use and legal to share, sell, bundle and build upon.

"It is heartening to have the outstanding work on the Ubuntu Font Family recognized by such a prestigious authority as the Design Museum," said Ivanka Majic, Creative Strategy Lead of Ubuntu. "We wanted to build a comprehensive high quality font in collaboration with Dalton Maag that would reflect the innovation and creativity of the open source world in its design. We also chose to share this with the web developers worldwide as an open source font. The exhibition recognizes how the Ubuntu Project is as much about design and user experience as it is about delivering great software."

For further details about the "Shape My Language" exhibition, please visit: http://designmuseum.org/design-overtime.

About the Ubuntu Font Family
The Ubuntu Font Family debuted in the current Ubuntu 10.10 release of the Ubuntu operating system and is also available for download from font.ubuntu.com. The Ubuntu Font Family can also be accessed through the Google Font Directory. Any web designer can now pick Ubuntu fonts from the Google Font Directory via the Google Font API, and bring the beauty and legibility of the Ubuntu fonts to their web properties.

How to add the Ubuntu Font Family
http://code.google.com/webfonts (Select "Ubuntu" and insert the two lines of CSS provided)

http://font.ubuntu.com/ (Complete open-source font download)

About Google Font API and Font Directory
The Google Font API serves over 30 million font views for web pages per day. The Google Web Fonts Team is establishing a core set of web fonts and simple-to-use technology that can be used openly across devices and platforms. Using a Google web font is as simple as selecting it from the directory and copying a few lines into a web page. Visit: code.google.com/webfonts

About Dalton Maag
Dalton Maag has been creating unique fonts and logotypes for some of the world’s largest organizations and brands since 1991. Today, Dalton Maag has an international team of fifteen designers, engineers, and other font specialists at studios in the UK and Brazil.

Dalton Maag partners with graphic designers as font experts in their branding projects. Its strongly international team gives Dalton Maag expertise in scripts beyond Latin, having designed and engineered typefaces for Arabic, Cyrillic, Greek, Hebrew and Indic scripts.

For more information about Dalton Maag and its client portfolio, visit http://www.daltonmaag.com/.

About Canonical Ltd.
Canonical provides engineering, online and professional services to Ubuntu partners and customers worldwide. As the company behind the Ubuntu project, Canonical is committed to the production and support of Ubuntu - an ever-popular and fast-growing open-source operating system. It aims to ensure that Ubuntu is available to every organization and individual on servers, desktops, laptops and netbooks.

Canonical partners with computer hardware manufacturers to certify Ubuntu, provides migration, deployment, support and training services to businesses, and offers online services direct to end users. Canonical also builds and maintains collaborative, open-source development tools to ensure that organizations and individuals can participate fully in innovations within the open-source community. For more information, please visit www.canonical.com

CONTACT: Joseph Eckert
Baker Communications Group, LLC
203-270-3711
jeckert@bakercg.com

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