Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

VMware to test new high-end product

Filed under

VMware will begin broadly testing a new version of its premium ESX Server product next week, a move that comes shortly after the EMC subsidiary began offering its basic server software package for free. Product delivery, however, could occur several months later than planned.

ESX Server, like the newly free VMware Server product, lets multiple operating systems run simultaneously on the same x86-based server, a feature that permits more efficient use of computing resources. ESX server runs atop a thin level of virtualization software, a technique that permits higher performance and more computing capacity than the VMware Server product, which runs atop a Windows or Linux host operating system.

As VMware has grown--it reported revenue of $115 million in the fourth quarter of 2005--its products have expanded from basic virtualization to higher-level software built on the basic foundation.

Full Story.


I have a few really old laptops that I've rescued for use in the TaoSecurity labs. One is a Thinkpad 600e PII 366 MHz with 128 MB RAM, and the other is a Thinkpad 1400 Pentium MMX 300 MHz with 256 MB RAM. Recently I wondered if I could use them as VMware Player running on them. First I needed a supported operating system. I first tried Ubuntu, since it looked like the most recent free OS with which I was familiar. Unfortunately, Ubuntu's live CD and installation CD hung on the two laptops I tried.

Full Post.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Red Hat eyes app platform leader with Samsung

Red Hat, the world's leading mobile application platform provider, says it will create an unprecedented partnership model with Samsung, a move it has been pushing to provide converged mobile systems at the enterprise level. Read more

A kid in an open source candy store

In 2009, I decided to leave HP and become an independent consultant. I presented at the inaugural LinuxCon on "Transforming Your Company with Open Source." Over time, my engagement with open source became more introspective. I wanted to integrate its lessons more fully into the personal development lessons that I was learning through my ongoing studies of psychology and spirituality. I thought back to the kid in the candy store. What open source was doing was connecting (and confronting!) me with the energy of abundance. This is the kind of energy that encourages positive action while loosening attachment to the fruits of that action, increasing self-awareness in the process. I wrote about this in a 2011 article on, and expanded on it further in chapter 3 of my book Enlightening Technical Leadership in 2013. Read more