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I'll tell you one thing about the Southern California Linux Expo: there is certainly no shortage of enthusiasm amongst the attendees. I'll tell you one thing about the Southern California Linux Expo: there is certainly no shortage of enthusiasm amongst the attendees. And thank goodness for that, because otherwise I might have passed out sometime after getting here.

Flying from Indiana to LA in one hop is convenient, but it plays heck with your body's schedule. Though I left at 9 local time this morning, and got here at 11 local time, by the time I actually got to lunch it was 3:30 back in the Hoosier State, and I had not eaten much for breakfast.

During Aaron Seigo's talk this morning on the progress of the KDE 4 desktop, specifically the Plasma prject he is working with, I nearly fainted from lack of food. But the crowd enthusiasm and Aaron's patented KDE Dance (which involved a bet, beer, and Jono Bacon. That's all I know.) kept me alert while Aaron regaled the session with very cool looking and sounding information on the near future of the KDE interface.

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