Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Can DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER Compete With Btrfs, ZFS?

Filed under
Software
BSD

The most common Linux file-systems we talk about at Phoronix are of course Btrfs and EXT4 while the ZFS file-system, which is available on Linux as a FUSE (user-space) module or via a recent kernel module port, gets mentioned a fair amount too. When it comes to the FreeBSD and PC-BSD operating systems, ZFS is looked upon as the superior, next-generation option that is available to BSD users. However, with the DragonFlyBSD operating system there is another option: HAMMER. In this article we are seeing how the performance of this original creation within the DragonFlyBSD project competes with ZFS, UFS, EXT3, EXT4, and Btrfs.

HAMMER is a file-system created by the DragonFlyBSD developers themselves and is the default choice when installing this BSD operating system, but UFS remains a choice too. The one sentence description about this file-system is that "[HAMMER] provides instant crash recovery, multi-volume file systems, integrity checking, fine grained history/undo, networked mirroring, and historical snapshots." HAMMER uses no fsck, can be sized up to one Exabyte, supports up to 256 volumes of four petabytes in size, coarse-grained history provided by snapshots with up to sixty days history, live snapshot access, and data/meta-data is CRC-checked.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

New Code Starts Lining Up For X.Org Server 1.17

X.Org Server 1.17 is planned for release at the start of 2015 and thus puts the closing of the merge window in the middle of October. While some xorg-server 1.17 code has already landed, more is on the way. X.Org Server 1.17 will continue with refining the in-server GLAMOR code that was merged with 1.16 for 2D acceleration in a generic manner over OpenGL. X.Org Server 1.17 is also looking to integrate the universal KMS mode-setting DDX driver. Keith Packard on Monday also shared several other code branches he's looking at as material for the 1.17 release. Read more

More Intel DRM Changes Queued For Linux 3.18, Including Old i830M Fixes

With the drm-next merge window for Linux 3.18 closing, Intel's open-source developers have submitted another round of changes for ultimately landing with the Linux 3.18 kernel. Intel has already sent in multiple pull requests of new DRM graphics driver code to push into drm-next for the Linux 3.18 merge window. Among the changes include various Cherryview improvements for the forthcoming low-power Atom SoC, and code clean-ups and continued Broadwell tweaks. Another Git pull request landed in drm-next over the night. Read more

Speeding up the Debian installer using eatmydata and dpkg-divert

The Debian installer could be a lot quicker. When we install more than 2000 packages in Skolelinux / Debian Edu using tasksel in the installer, unpacking the binary packages take forever. A part of the slow I/O issue was discussed in bug #613428 about too much file system sync-ing done by dpkg, which is the package responsible for unpacking the binary packages. Other parts (like code executed by postinst scripts) might also sync to disk during installation. All this sync-ing to disk do not really make sense to me. If the machine crash half-way through, I start over, I do not try to salvage the half installed system. So the failure sync-ing is supposed to protect against, hardware or system crash, is not really relevant while the installer is running. Read more

Samsung's first open-source conference kicks off, with Tizen on its mind

The inaugural Samsung Open-Source Conference opens Tuesday morning in Seoul, with keynotes from well-known figures in the open source world and a hackathon focused on Tizen, the company’s in-house mobile operating system. The event kicks off with a speech from Jono Bacon, the former community manager for Ubuntu, who recently moved to the XPrize Foundation, and also includes talks from Linux kernel developer Tejun Heo and Carsten Heitzler, the principal creator of the Enlightenment desktop environment for Linux. Read more Also: Samsung Electronics to host first open-source conference