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New SEC Filing Reveals Attachmate-Novell Next Moves

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SUSE

How does Attachmate plan to manage Novell’s products and channel partner strategy? An SEC Filing dated January 3, 2011 provides some new clues. The bottom line: While Attachmate seems committed to Novell’s products and partner program, some individual brand names could change or fade away. Plus, Attachmate and Novell still need to work out when and where the Novell BrainShare conferences will be held this year. Here’s the update.

As you’ll recall, Attachmate announced plans to acquire Novell in November 2010. The deal is expected to close sometime in Q1 2011. How will the companies move forward with one another — and customers and partners? A recent SEC filing describes a lengthy, scripted Q&A document that Attachmate and Novell have shared with employees. On the channel front, the Q&A states:

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The Last Days of NetWare?

enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: As Novell and Attachmate continue to perform the ritual mating dance of corporate acquisition, Linux and open source community members are holding their breath, waiting to see what will happen to the SUSE Linux and openSUSE product lines.

In the midst of this, one question seems to be missing: What will happen to NetWare?

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