Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Get Slack!

Filed under
Slack

If you follow this blog, you know that I’ve been using Slackware for more or less three months now, Slackware as you may already know is the oldest surviving Linux distribution.

How I started with Slackware?, Well I’m using Arch Linux for about two years now. In the Arch Linux Wiki, there is a comparison of Arch Linux with other distributions, one of them is Slackware.

According to that page:

Slackware and Arch are quite similar in that both are simple distributions focused on elegance and minimalism. Slackware is famous for its lack of branding and completely vanilla packages, from the kernel up. Arch typically applies patching only to avoid severe breakage or to ensure packages will compile cleanly. Both use BSD-style init scripts. Arch supplies a package management system in pacman which, unlike Slackware’s standard tools, offers automatic dependency resolution and allows for more automated system upgrades.
Arch offers the Arch Build System, an actual ports-like system and also the AUR, a very large collection of PKGBUILDs contributed by users. Slackware offers a similar, though slimmer system at slackbuilds.org which is a semi-official repository of Slackbuilds, which are analogous to Arch PKGBUILDs. Slackware users will generally be quite comfortable with most aspects of Arch.

So, that reading made me want to test Slackware, there is where all began.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Getting started with Shotwell

Shotwell is a simple yet powerful program that comes installed with most flavors of Fedora, such as Fedora Workstation and the Cinnamon desktop spin. It’s also available for install on any other desktop or spin. You can use it as either a photo viewer and organizer, or an editor. Read more

Go(lang) meets Fedora

Yes, Golang is there. Both implementations are available in Fedora repositories. Golang(Gc) since Fedora 17 initially packaged by Adam Goode in version 1.1 and gcc-go since Fedora 15 in version of gcc 4.6.0(pre go1.0?, definitely not used much back then) packaged as part of gcc by GCC maintainers. Currently as for F22/F23 as golang-1.5.3 and gcc-5 and for upcoming F24 as golang-1.6 and gcc-6 respectively. Both implementation can be installed in parallel thanks to the Fedora alternatives. Read more

LOHAN entertains the crowd at Oz Linux shindig

Our Low Orbit Helium Assisted Navigator (LOHAN) mission took to the stage at the linux.conf.au 2016 in Geelong last Friday, as Linux guru and Vulture 2 spaceplane autopilot wrangler Andrew Tridgell gave an entertaining speech on his currently UAV endeavours. Tridge kicked off his presentation (video here) with a look at the two vehicles he and CanberraUAV are prepping for the 2016 UAV Challenge - a petrol-driven chopper and a VTOL quadplane. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Kramden Institute bridges digital divide with refurbished computers
    Ken's love of programming eventually led to a job at Canonical, and then he learned about the Kramden Institute. "At first I was just excited about what they do for so many children," he says. "It's truly an amazing organization. After hearing about Kramden, I very quickly signed up to work a Wednesday work night, which was really a blast. Wednesday evening at Kramden is an event to remember. They are incredibly well organized and almost always have a full house. It's a community of folks that want to help these children; I just fit right in."
  • Why I use openSUSE over other distributions.
    The below is a response to a Facebook query on why we use openSUSE over Ubuntu. I was happy with how it turned out and thought it could prove helpful to a larger audience.
  • OMG, Ubuntu Tablet Could Be a Mobile Game Changer
  • Maru Is an Android OS on the Phone and Debian Linux When Connected to PC
    A new project named Maru promises to provide users with a full Android Lollipop experience on the phone and switch to a Debian Linux distro when connected to a monitor and peripherals. A phone that is powered by Android and magically transforms into a Linux desktop when connected to an external display has been tried before. It was called Ubuntu for Android, and it was one of Canonical's earliest attempts at some sort of convergence between the mobile and PC worlds.