Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Big Presentation: The Familiar, the Frustrating and the Flashy

Filed under
Software

One of my biggest concerns when I adopted the Linux OS over Microsoft Windows was Linux's ability to supply me with a robust presentation program. I did lots of lecturing and instructional seminars. Those activities required a product that closely mimicked Microsoft PowerPoint quality. The resulting file also had to be compatible with PowerPoint.

My first foray into a replacement for the Microsoft Office suite of which PowerPoint is an industry staple was the close look-alike bundle from OpenOffice.org. Its presentation module, called "Impress," did a great job of doing exactly that -- impressing me.

Impress let me work much the same as if I were still using PowerPoint. It botched some of the display elements when viewed in PowerPoint, however. But if I avoided the really fancy stuff in my slide designs, I got few complaints from colleagues who imported the Impress presentations in Windows.

Two other Linux apps give you different options for working with presentations. An alternative to OpenOffice's clone app of PowerPoint is the module bundled in the KDE Project. KPresenter is a full-featured app with fewer bells and whistles.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu turns 10: A look back at desktop Linux standard bearer

Tech pundits differ, to say the least, on a lot of topics in the world of free and open-source software, but it’s inarguable that Ubuntu has been the most influential Linux desktop distribution of the past decade. On the occasion of its 10th anniversary, here’s a brief look back. Read more

Forking Debian, Celebrating Ubuntu, and Best Desktops

Debian and Ubuntu dominated the headlines today with various topics. The community is is celebrating Ubuntu's 10 years and Mark Shuttleworth announced the next codename. Debian lost a contributor and released 7.7 over the weekend while the threat of a fork is pushing a freedom choice. In other news we have Gentoo and 4MLinux reviews as well as the chance to vote for the best Linux desktop environment. Read more

5 open access journals for open source enthusiasts

The ever rising cost of academic journals is a major burden for researchers. Academic libraries cannot always keep up with increases in subscription fees causing libraries to drop journals from their collection. This makes it harder for students and professors to quickly and easily access the information they need. Inter-library loan requests are an option but they do take time. Even if it only takes a few days to fill an inter-library loan request, that is still time wasted for a researcher that has a deadline. While there is no single, quick fix to the problem with the academic journal prices, there is a movement applying the open source way to academic research in an attempt to solve the problem—the open access movement. Read more

Leftovers: Software