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Today will define the Internet

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Web

THE IRONICALLY TITLED LAND OF THE FREE today will decide if people and companies with money should have better and faster access to the worldwide web.

Giant Internet service providers (ISPs) like Comcast and Verizon want to offer better access to corporations that can afford to pay for it. Standing in their way is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which has the power to issue regulations to protect net neutrality.

Like we mentioned yesterday, unfortunately for the US the FCC has been keen to listen attentively to corporate interests, and draft regulations written by FCC chairman Julius Genachowski suggest that the telecoms and ISPs will win almost all they wanted.

Today the FCC will be meeting to discuss and vote on chairman Genachowski's draft order. Details of the order have not been made public, but early indications suggest that it is unlikely to do much to protect net neutrality.

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(Editor's Note: It has passed 3 - 2, with the two Republicans being opposed to Internet regulation. Critics of the regulation predict the new incoming Republican majority Congress will try and fight this as well.)




...

I'm sad to hear it played out this way for internet users in America. Another mask down - this time of "support for net neutrality".

If only!

If only the "journalists" at the Inquirer had actually read anything. Contrary to the shoddy reporting companies like comcast and verizon are now free "to offer better access to corporations that can afford to pay for it." "Tolls" did not go away. Rather than providing better service companies like comcast and verizon continue to use the government to strangle the marketplace and consumers. This unconstitutional end-run does nothing to protect the internet.

FCC: wireless neutrality regulations skipped because Android

"We recognize that there have been meaningful recent moves toward openness, including the introduction of open operating systems like Android. In addition, we anticipate soon seeing the effects on the market of the openness conditions we imposed on mobile providers that operate on upper 700 MHz C-Block spectrum, which includes Verizon Wireless, one of the largest mobile wireless carriers in the U.S.

In light of these considerations, we conclude it is appropriate to take measured steps at this time to protect the openness of the Internet when accessed through mobile broadband."

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