Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Today will define the Internet

Filed under
Web

THE IRONICALLY TITLED LAND OF THE FREE today will decide if people and companies with money should have better and faster access to the worldwide web.

Giant Internet service providers (ISPs) like Comcast and Verizon want to offer better access to corporations that can afford to pay for it. Standing in their way is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which has the power to issue regulations to protect net neutrality.

Like we mentioned yesterday, unfortunately for the US the FCC has been keen to listen attentively to corporate interests, and draft regulations written by FCC chairman Julius Genachowski suggest that the telecoms and ISPs will win almost all they wanted.

Today the FCC will be meeting to discuss and vote on chairman Genachowski's draft order. Details of the order have not been made public, but early indications suggest that it is unlikely to do much to protect net neutrality.

rest here

(Editor's Note: It has passed 3 - 2, with the two Republicans being opposed to Internet regulation. Critics of the regulation predict the new incoming Republican majority Congress will try and fight this as well.)




...

I'm sad to hear it played out this way for internet users in America. Another mask down - this time of "support for net neutrality".

If only!

If only the "journalists" at the Inquirer had actually read anything. Contrary to the shoddy reporting companies like comcast and verizon are now free "to offer better access to corporations that can afford to pay for it." "Tolls" did not go away. Rather than providing better service companies like comcast and verizon continue to use the government to strangle the marketplace and consumers. This unconstitutional end-run does nothing to protect the internet.

FCC: wireless neutrality regulations skipped because Android

"We recognize that there have been meaningful recent moves toward openness, including the introduction of open operating systems like Android. In addition, we anticipate soon seeing the effects on the market of the openness conditions we imposed on mobile providers that operate on upper 700 MHz C-Block spectrum, which includes Verizon Wireless, one of the largest mobile wireless carriers in the U.S.

In light of these considerations, we conclude it is appropriate to take measured steps at this time to protect the openness of the Internet when accessed through mobile broadband."

rest here

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux tutorial website

Hi guys, here you have a website that covers Linux basics: http://linux-bible.com. Most of the examples are from Ubuntu.

Today in Techrights

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more