Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The end of the (free) pipe dream?

Filed under
Web

What's gone wrong? Your service provider has abandoned the principle of network neutrality - that a particular service should be treated the same no matter who provides it. Unlike traffic shaping, which prioritises time-sensitive services such as internet telephony over less critical ones like music downloads, lack of network neutrality means that you no longer have a free choice of internet telephony service, as your ISP slows down or even refuses to carry the traffic of providers who haven't paid.

Although ISPs in the UK currently maintain neutrality, the issue is becoming a big one in the United States, with Senate hearings being held amid the clash of lobbyists. Service providers want network neutrality to be the law.

Telecommunications infrastructure providers on the other hand, frustrated that their stock is clapped in irons in the hold while that of Google and other service providers admires the view from the crow's nest, are planning a mutiny. They want a piece of that $2 billion-per-quarter treasure chest.

Ed Whitacre, the chief executive of SBC, a large telecoms company, summarised their frustration last year when he said: "Why should the service providers be allowed to use my pipes? The internet can't be free in that sense, because we and the cable companies have made an investment and for a Google or Yahoo! or Vonage or anybody to expect to use these pipes for free is nuts!"

So should telecoms companies be allowed to discriminate?

Full Story.

I'm all for making a buck...

But come on, we pay them quite enough for the poor service they already provide. And just how are they going to differentiate between a telephone call, an mp3 download, and an e-mail?

*******
http://myfirstlinux.com

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Launching into Orbit
    We’re excited to announce today the release of a BioWare project that’s unlike anything we’ve done before. Over the past few months, the BioWare Online Services team has been working hard on the next-generation of our online technology platform: Orbit.
  • The Big SuperTuxKart Update Is Almost Ready
    Towards the end of last year a development version of a big new version of SuperTuxKart was released that brought a new OpenGL 3.1+ graphics engine and other improvements. The new SuperTuxKart game looks great (especially for being an open-source game) and is now closer to being officially released with now having an RC version out.
  • Humble Indie Bundle 14 Drops Torchlight 2, Outlast, and Other Awesome Games on Linux
    Following on the footsteps of the fantastic success of the previous Humble Indie Bundle initiatives, the awesome people behind Humble Bundle, Inc. have put together yet another amazing collection of cross-platform games entitled Humble Indie Bundle 14.
  • New Linux Gaming Survey For April
    The new GOL survey for April is now available, so please make sure to fill it in if you have the time.
  • Team Fortress 2 Update Brings Balancing Fixes
    Team Fortress 2 is an online multiplayer game developed by Valve and it's one of the most popular titles on Steam for Linux. A new update has been released for it, and it applies to the Linux version as well.
  • Grass Simulator Fully Released With Linux Support
    April Fools! Wait, this is real? Grass Simulator added Linux support recently, and today they have released the final version.

Android Leftovers