Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

One Drupal to rule them all

Filed under
Drupal

Ten years ago, the average organization had one website. Since then, the world has become a more complex place with a diverse set of needs. If you're like most organizations the number of sites you have continues to grow at a rapid clip. You've dipped your toe into the social media waters by setting up one or more blogs, you use microsites for the foundation of your marketing efforts to promote products and events, and community sites to engage with the people who use your products. And of course, you have your corporate website, as well as your intranet and a number of internal collaboration websites for different projects. This is today's reality.

During the past year, I've met with many organizations that have hundreds of sites; some even have thousands of sites. Most of these sites are vastly different in terms of scale, functionality, complexity and longevity. As a result, the level of investment and the time to market requirements are usually very different. Some of the websites are owned by the company's IT department while other websites may be owned by their marketing department.

For most organizations, one tool cannot get the job done, so they keep multiple tools in their toolbox - whether they intend to or not. Unfortunately this is a common scenario in many enterprises. We see many organizations that run on Vignette, but they add WordPress to power their blog, and use SharePoint for their intranet. Managing integration and multiple (proprietary) solutions is not only costly but it acts as a roadblock to innovation and slows time to market when changes are needed.

It can be a complete mess.




More in Tux Machines

Recent open source hardware trends, from SBCs to servers

At ELC Europe, Intel MinnowBoard SBC evangelist John Hawley surveyed open hardware trends, and their impact on OS-enabled device and system development. When you mention open source hardware, people typically think about community-backed hacker boards. However, the open hardware movement is growing on many fronts, including medical devices, rocketry and satellites, 3D printers, cameras, VR gear, and even laptops and servers. At the Embedded Linux Conference Europe in October, John “Warthog9” Hawley, Intel’s evangelist for the MinnowBoard SBC, surveyed the key open hardware trends he saw in 2016. The full video, “Survey of Open Hardware 2016,” can be seen below. Read more Also in: Open Source Hardware: From SBCs to Servers

Open-O Merges with ECOMP

Linux Kernels 4.9.12 & 4.4.51 Now Available with Small Changes, Updated Drivers

Greg Kroah-Hartman announced today the general availability of two new maintenance updates for the long-term supported Linux 4.9 and Linux 4.4 kernel updates for Linux-based operating systems. Read more

Recreating the PCLinuxOS Full Monty with KDE Plasma Activities

When I recently wrote about the new PCLinuxOS release, I was a bit disappointed to find that the Full Monty version had been laid to rest. I'm sure there were a lot of good reasons for this decision, and I have no quarrel with it. But it still made me a bit sad, because I have always kept the Full Monty on at least one of my systems (it is currently on my Acer All-In-One desktop), and I often showed it to people who were curious about Linux, as an example of its breadth, depth and flexibility. So I decided that it might be a useful exercise for me to try to create the equivalent of the Full Monty desktop starting from the latest PCLinuxOS KDE5 distribution. There are two major features which distinguish the Full Monty desktop - it had six virtual desktops, each of which was dedicated to a specific use, and it had lots and lots and lots of packages installed. The desktops looked like this: Read more