Speeding Up The Linux Kernel With Transparent Hugepage Support

Filed under
Linux

Last month we reported on the 200 line Linux kernel patch that does wonders for improving the desktop responsiveness of the system. There was certainly much interest (over 100,000 views to both of our YouTube videos demonstrating the change) but this patch really didn't speed up the system per se but rather improved the desktop interactivity and reduced latency by creating task-groups per TTY so that the processes had more equal access to the CPU. There is though an entirely different patch-set now beginning to generate interest among early adopters that does improve the kernel performance itself in compute and memory intensive applications and it's the Transparent Hugepage Support patch-set. Here are our initial tests of the latest kernel patches that will hopefully be finding their way into the mainline Linux kernel soon.

As was pointed out in our forums, the Transparent Hugepage Support patch-set has been updated against the Linux 2.6.37 kernel code-base and is showing to improve the performance in compute/memory intensive applications by a couple percent at this time. The Transparent Hugepage Support in the Linux kernel works by reducing the number of TLB (Translation Lookaside Buffer) entries that such applications need and at the same time increasing the cap that a TLB cache can provide.

rest here