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Ubuntu 10.10 vs. Mac OS X 10.6.5: A Competitive Race

We began our tests of this new Mac Book Pro last week by starting out with looking at the power consumption between Mac OS X and Linux where we found that Apple's operating system generally consumed less power on their own hardware than with Ubuntu 10.10 and the Linux 2.6.35 kernel, but that isn't to a huge surprise. With today's cross-platform tests, we are looking at the performance for OpenGL, OpenCL, CPU, and disk performance, among other areas.

The Apple Mac-F22586C8 being used boasts an Intel Core i5 520M processor clocked at 2.40GHz, 4GB of DDR3-1066MHz memory, a 320GB Hitachi HTS54503 SATA 5400RPM hard drive, and a NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M (GT216) 256MB graphics processor. The Mac OS X 10.6.5 release was used with its 10.5.0 kernel, X.Org Server 1.4.2-apple56, Apple's NVIDIA graphics driver, the Journaled HFS+ file-system, and Xcode 3.2.5 that provides GCC 4.2.1 and Clang. On the Linux side was Ubuntu 10.10 "Maverick Meerkat" with the Linux 2.6.35-22-generic kernel, X.Org Server 1.9.0, the NVIDIA 260.19.21 display driver providing OpenGL 3.3.0, GCC 4.4.5, GNOME 2.32.0 desktop, and an EXT4 file-system.

As the Phoronix Test Suite builds many of its tests from source, with this article we compared the results of both Mac OS X 10.6.5 and Ubuntu 10.10 when using their stock compilers (as found in the latest version of Xcode for Mac OS X and within the Maverick package repository for Ubuntu 10.10) as well as when building self-hosting versions of GCC 4.5.1 under each operating system. Aside from this, as usual, each operating system was tested in its stock configuration.

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