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Blender: No Maya. No RAM.

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Software

Cut to the 21st century. Ram has aged gracefully. He looks more muscular and more global: a blend between American comic super-heroes, Japanese manga characters, and Amar Chitra Katha gods. This modern avatar of Ram is now trapped in the RAM of high-end computers, rapidly rendered pixel-by-pixel by multi-headed CPU demons. The illusion of Maya is now complete. Everything that seems real is nothing but 3D software spinning its magic.

Big game hunting

That software, alas, is where Ravana hides today. Proprietary 3D software is the new Lanka. You can see signs of its growing influence in every city across the Indian sub-continent. Dozens of animation schools have suddenly opened shop across India. Fierce monsters and large-eyed goblins adorn their facades. The animation and VFX industry is the new goddess of wealth—according to a KPMG-FICCI report released this year, the industry is currently at Rs 3.2 billion, and will grow to Rs 46.6 billion by 2014.

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