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Gaming on GNU/Linux: Ryzom MMORPG Goes Native

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Gaming

Winch Gate Properties Ltd has announced the release of the official native GNU/Linux client for the massively-multiplayer online science-fantasy role playing game, Ryzom. To celebrate the release Ryzom is hosting an in-game contest with a grand prize of a ZaReason Terra-HD Netbook.

After releasing Ryzom to the free software community six months ago, with support from the Free Software Foundation, Winch Gate are now officially releasing a native Ryzom client for GNU/Linux game players.

Vianney Lecroart, Chief Technology Officer of Winch Gate said, "Players can now download a ready-to-run version of the Ryzom MMORPG or compile a version for themselves from our source code to create additional clients for their favored GNU/Linux distribution"

To celebrate the release of the native GNU/Linux client Ryzom will host an in-game contest ending January 10th, 2011. The grand prize is a ZaReason Linux Terra-HD Netbook, valued at $450 or the equivalent in cash. The second and third prizes are a one year free subscription to Ryzom.

To participate, players will have to log into the game and find the seven relevant GNU/Linux artifacts hidden throughout Silan, the starting island. Each of the seven artifacts will test a player's knowledge of Ryzom. The winners will be drawn from the players with the correct answers. Contestants can participate freely in the contest using a free 21-day trial option.

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