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Ubuntu is ‘not changing to a rolling release’

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu’s Rick Spencer has issued a statement refuting the earlier claims reported by The Register that Ubuntu was to switch to ‘daily releases’.

Posting the statement on his blog, Rick said: -

“Ubuntu is not changing to a rolling release. We are confident that our customers, partners, and the FLOSS ecosystem are well served by our current release cadence.

What the article was probably referring to was the possibility of making it easier for developers to use cutting edge versions of certain software packages on Ubuntu. This is a wide-ranging project that we will continue to pursue through our normal planning processes.”

rest here




Flip Floppers!!!

Flip Floppers!!! Big Grin

Damn, a rolling release would

Damn, a rolling release would have made me consider switching back to ubuntu. Oh well I shall stick with Arch then Smile

stick with Arch

wolfric wrote:
Damn, a rolling release would have made me consider switching back to ubuntu. Oh well I shall stick with Arch then Smile

Good choice!

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