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Three things to not forget to make LibreOffice (and ODF) succeed

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LibO

OpenOffice (OOo) is the free, currently most popular alternative to Microsoft Office, the office suite that (with active help from some schools and Public Administrations) creates cocain-like addiction problems.

The OpenDocument Format (ODF) is an international standard for office documents like texts, presentations and spreadsheets. ODF is already widely adopted worldwide. Using ODF for all your office documents is by far the easiest, safest and most realistic way today to really free yourself from the cocain-like nature of Microsoft Office file formats. The fact that using secret file formats instead of ODF is what actually maintains the Microsoft monopoly in desktop computing is proved even by a Microsoft job offer.

OpenOffice is Free/Open Source Software, but its development is controlled by software giant Oracle. For this reason, a big part of the OpenOffice larger community created in October 2010 The Document Foundation (TDF), to develop what it calls “the next evolution of the world’s leading free office suite”, an OpenOffice spin-off named LibreOffice. In my opinion, the success of OpenOffice, LibreOffice and of the only thing that really matters here, that is ODF (we use software because we need documents, not the other way around) depends (also) on handling three issues.

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